Discussion:
Egypt's Sun King: A Symposium in Toronto on November 6, 2010
(too old to reply)
The SSEA
2010-09-01 13:19:56 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
THE 35th ANNUAL SYMPOSIUM
of The Society for the Study of Egyptian Antiquities/Société pour
l’Étude de l’Égypte Ancienne:
EGYPT'S SUN KING, Amenhotep III

Before Tutankhamen, Egypt's 18th dynasty was ruled by another "golden"
king, a pharaoh so extravagantly wealthy that his allies asked for
statues of solid gold, for "gold is like dust in Egypt": Amenhotep
III. This wealth, harvested from the largest empire in the Bronze
Age, supported a grandiose construction program. Amongst his projects
was a gorgeous, gleaming palace on the banks of the Nile that rivalled
the baroque castles of Europe for interior design with painted and
inlaid walls, and an artificial lake nearby. Now, Dr. Catharine
Roehrig of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, one of the archaeologists
trying to record and preserve this lost Versailles, will present an
overview of the palace and of their work.

Ruling an empire that stretched from modern-day Sudan to Syria, and
dealing with the envy of other states was no easy feat. Archaeologist
and historian Prof. Eric Cline of George Washington University will
reveal ancient political manoeverings as he outlines Egypt's foreign
relations in the 14th century BC.

International diplomacy and intimate relationships converged in the
family of Amenhotep III, especially in the person of his chief wife,
Queen Tiye and the foreign princesses he married. Gayle Gibson of the
Royal Ontario Museum will offer us a brief reconstruction of the royal
family tree. Then, Dr. Lyn Green will look at the power of the queens,
its religious basis and its political implications.

The art of Amenhotep III is some of the most beautiful and technically
accomplished ever produced in the ancient world. Prof. Besty Bryan of
Johns Hopkins University will examine the art of the reign.

To find out more about one of Egypt's most magnificent and fascinating
pharaohs, join us on the campus of the University of Toronto on
Saturday November 6th while an international panel of scholars and
archaeologists reveal the mysteries of Egypt's Sun King, Amenhotep
III.

This event is presented in association with the Royal Ontario Museum
To register, visit the Royal Ontario Museum's website, www.rom.on.ca/programs
Keyword: Egypt or Program ID 6303. Phone 416-586-5797 to register by
telephone.
The symposium is $90 for general public; $80 for ROM and SSEA members;
and $40 for students (online prices). The Secretaries of the SSEA will
be present, and will have a list of SSEA members with them, should
questions arise about membership. No emails will be answered from 5pm
Thursday, Nov. 4th until 9am, Monday, Nov. 8th.

The Symposium will be held in Rm. 1050, the Earth Sciences Auditorium,
at 5 Bancroft Ave., Toronto. Should you require assistance or
directions on the day of the Symposium itself, please contact the SSEA
by phone at 647-520-4339. No one will be available to answer email
enquiries.

SCHOLARS' COLLOQUIUM
Each year, accompanying its annual Symposium, The Society for the
Study of Egyptian Antiquities/Société pour l’Étude de l’Égypte
Ancienne also presents a day and a half of 20-minute scholarly
presentations by Egyptologists from all over the world. Entry to
these presentations is free. The first day of presentations will be
on Friday, November 5th in the Royal Ontario Museum Lecture Theatre.
The second day of presentations will take place at 5 Bancroft Ave.
For more information, visit www.thessea.org or email ***@thessea.org

The SSEA encourages all members of the public to attend our lectures
and events and we want to make this easier for people by providing
information regarding accessibility of venues for events, and
directions to lecture venues. Please contact The SSEA by emailing us
at ***@thessea.org or phoning us at 647-520-433 if you need
directions to get to one of our events, or if you are a person with a
disability and require accommodation.

About The Speakers:

Betsy Bryan is Alexander Badawy Professor of Egyptian Art and
Archaeology, and Near Eastern Studies Professor at Johns Hopkins
University, and the author of numerous books and articles on the late
18th dynasty, including: The reign of Thutmose IV (1991), and co-
author of Egypt's dazzling sun : Amenhotep III and his world. She was
co-curator of the important exhibit for which this book was the
catalogue. She is excavating at the Precinct of Mut Complex in Luxor.

Dr. Catharine H. Roehrig is a curator, Department of Egyptian Art, The
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. She studied at the University of
California, Berkeley where she received her PhD in Egyptian
Archaeology. Dr. Roehrig specializes in the art and history of the New
Kingdom and has a particular interest in the monuments of the Theban
necropolis (opposite modern Luxor), where she has conducted most of
her fieldwork. She is the author of numerous books and articles,
including Hathshepsut: From Queen to Pharaoh. She is currently
excavating at the remains of the palace of Amenhotep III at Malkata.

Dr. Eric H. Cline has degrees in Classical Archaeology, Near Eastern
Archaeology, and Ancient History from Dartmouth College (1982), Yale
University (1984), and the University of Pennsylvania (1991)
respectively. He currently serves as Chair of the Department of
Classics and Semitics at George Washington University. He has been
digging at the site of Megiddo in Israel for 7 seasons and is Co-
Director of the excavations at Tel Kabri. His primary fields of study
are the military history of the Mediterranean world from antiquity to
present and the international connections between Greece, Egypt, and
the Near East during the Late Bronze Age (1700-1100 BCE). Prof. Cline,
a former Fulbright scholar, is author of Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea:
International Trade and the Late Bronze Age Aegean and numerous other
books on the Bronze Age and Biblical archaeology. He wrote the section
entitled "Amenhotep III, the Aegean and Anatolia" in Amenhotep III:
Perspectives on His Reign, one of the most important works on the
king's reign, and was the book's co-editor.

Dr. Lyn Green received her doctorate from the University of Toronto
for a thesis entitled Queens and princesses of the Amarna period: the
social, political, religious and cultic role of the women of the royal
family at the end of the eighteenth dynasty. She has written on
Egyptian queens in a number of publications, including the chapter
"Who was Who at Amarna" in The Royal Women of Amarna, the catalgue the
exhibition of the same name at The Metropolitan Museum of Art and
"Queen as Goddess" in Amarna Letters 2.

Gayle Gibson studied Egyptology at the University of Toronto,
receiving her Masters degree in 1988. Since 1990 she has worked at the
Royal Ontario Museum in the Education and Programs Department, and is
a popular educator, lecturer and tour leader and appears frequently on
television as a "guest expert". Her main enthusiasm as an Egyptologist
is for mummies and their coffins and she has lectured widely on royal
mummies and other human remains from ancient Egypt.
mohamed baheej
2010-09-17 22:24:33 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by The SSEA
THE 35th ANNUAL SYMPOSIUM
of The Society for the Study of Egyptian Antiquities/Société pour
EGYPT'S SUN KING, Amenhotep III
Before Tutankhamen, Egypt's 18th dynasty was ruled by another "golden"
king, a pharaoh so extravagantly wealthy that his allies asked for
statues of solid gold, for "gold is like dust in Egypt": Amenhotep
III.   This wealth, harvested from the largest empire in the Bronze
Age, supported a grandiose construction program.  Amongst his projects
was a gorgeous, gleaming palace on the banks of the Nile that rivalled
the baroque castles of Europe for interior design with painted and
inlaid walls, and an artificial lake nearby.  Now, Dr. Catharine
Roehrig of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, one of the archaeologists
trying to record and preserve this lost Versailles, will present an
overview of the palace and of their work.
Ruling an empire that stretched from modern-day Sudan to Syria, and
dealing with the envy of other states was no easy feat. Archaeologist
and historian Prof. Eric Cline of George Washington University will
reveal ancient political manoeverings as he outlines Egypt's foreign
relations in the 14th century BC.
International diplomacy and intimate relationships converged in the
family of Amenhotep III, especially in the person of his chief wife,
Queen Tiye and the foreign princesses he married. Gayle Gibson of the
Royal Ontario Museum will offer us a brief reconstruction of the royal
family tree. Then, Dr. Lyn Green will look at the power of the queens,
its religious basis and its political implications.
The art of Amenhotep III is some of the most beautiful and technically
accomplished ever produced in the ancient world. Prof. Besty Bryan of
Johns Hopkins University will examine the art of the reign.
To find out more about one of Egypt's most magnificent and fascinating
pharaohs, join us on the campus of the University of Toronto on
Saturday November 6th while an international panel of scholars and
archaeologists reveal the mysteries of Egypt's Sun King, Amenhotep
III.
This event is presented in association with the Royal Ontario Museum
To register, visit the Royal Ontario Museum's website,www.rom.on.ca/programs
Keyword: Egypt or Program ID 6303. Phone 416-586-5797  to register by
telephone.
The symposium is $90 for general public; $80 for ROM and SSEA members;
and $40 for students (online prices). The Secretaries of the SSEA will
be present, and will have a list of SSEA members with them, should
questions arise about membership. No emails will be answered from 5pm
Thursday, Nov. 4th until 9am, Monday, Nov. 8th.
The Symposium will be held in Rm. 1050, the Earth Sciences Auditorium,
at 5 Bancroft Ave., Toronto. Should you require assistance or
directions on the day of the Symposium itself, please contact the SSEA
by phone at 647-520-4339. No one will be available to answer email
enquiries.
SCHOLARS' COLLOQUIUM
Each year, accompanying its annual Symposium, The Society for the
Study of Egyptian Antiquities/Société pour l’Étude de l’Égypte
Ancienne also presents a day and a half of 20-minute scholarly
presentations by Egyptologists from all over the world.  Entry to
these presentations is free.  The first day of presentations will be
on Friday, November 5th in the Royal Ontario Museum Lecture Theatre.
The second day of presentations will take place at 5 Bancroft Ave.
The SSEA encourages all members of the public to attend our lectures
and events and we want to make this easier for people by providing
information regarding accessibility of venues for events, and
directions to lecture venues. Please contact The SSEA by emailing us
directions to get to one of our events, or if you are a person with a
disability and require accommodation.
Betsy Bryan is Alexander Badawy Professor of Egyptian Art and
Archaeology, and Near Eastern Studies Professor at Johns Hopkins
University, and the author of numerous books and articles on the late
18th dynasty, including: The reign of Thutmose IV (1991), and co-
author of Egypt's dazzling sun : Amenhotep III and his world. She was
co-curator of the important exhibit for which this book was the
catalogue. She is excavating at the Precinct of Mut Complex in Luxor.
Dr. Catharine H. Roehrig is a curator, Department of Egyptian Art, The
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. She studied at the University of
California, Berkeley where she received her PhD in Egyptian
Archaeology. Dr. Roehrig specializes in the art and history of the New
Kingdom and has a particular interest in the monuments of the Theban
necropolis (opposite modern Luxor), where she has conducted most of
her fieldwork. She is the author of numerous books and articles,
including Hathshepsut: From Queen to Pharaoh. She is currently
excavating at the remains of the palace of Amenhotep III at Malkata.
Dr. Eric H. Cline has degrees in Classical Archaeology, Near Eastern
Archaeology, and Ancient History from Dartmouth College (1982), Yale
University (1984), and the University of Pennsylvania (1991)
respectively. He currently serves as Chair of the Department of
Classics and Semitics at George Washington University. He has been
digging at the site of Megiddo in Israel for 7 seasons and is Co-
Director of the excavations at Tel Kabri. His primary fields of study
are the military history of the Mediterranean world from antiquity to
present and the international connections between Greece, Egypt, and
the Near East during the Late Bronze Age (1700-1100 BCE). Prof. Cline,
International Trade and the Late Bronze Age Aegean and numerous other
books on the Bronze Age and Biblical archaeology. He wrote the section
Perspectives on His Reign, one of the most important works on the
king's reign, and was the book's co-editor.
Dr. Lyn Green received her doctorate from the University of Toronto
for a thesis entitled Queens and princesses of the Amarna period: the
social, political, religious and cultic role of the women of the royal
family at the end of the eighteenth dynasty. She has written on
Egyptian queens in a number of publications, including the chapter
"Who was Who at Amarna" in The Royal Women of Amarna, the catalgue the
exhibition of the same name at The Metropolitan Museum of Art and
"Queen as Goddess" in Amarna Letters 2.
Gayle Gibson studied Egyptology at the University of Toronto,
receiving her Masters degree in 1988. Since 1990 she has worked at the
Royal Ontario Museum in the Education and Programs Department, and is
a popular educator, lecturer and tour leader and appears frequently on
television as a "guest expert". Her main enthusiasm as an Egyptologist
is for mummies and their coffins and she has lectured widely on royal
mummies and other human remains from ancient Egypt.
http://baheejonline.bravehost.com/mab.html the best egyptian site
for Education

Loading...