Discussion:
Northern Cal. ARCE/UCB Lecture: George Reisner and the Giza Pyramids
(too old to reply)
Glenn Meyer
2003-09-11 08:49:25 UTC
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The Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt
the Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley,
and the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley,
present the lecture

George Reisner and the Giza Pyramids:
Past, Present and Future

by
Dr. Peter Der Manuelian
Mellon Research Fellow in Egyptian Art
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Date: Sunday, September 28, 2003
Time: 2:30 p.m.
Place: 370 Dwinelle Hall
UC Berkeley Campus

A donation of $5 per person ($3 per
student) is requested to offset the
cost of the lecture.

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American Research Center in Egypt
Northern California Chapter
P. O. Box 11352
Berkeley, CA 94712-2352

Website: http://hometown.aol.com/hebsed/index.htm

For more information please call 510-527-9746
or send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu
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***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2004-01-12 08:20:06 UTC
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The Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt
and the Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley,
present the lecture

Final Accountings:
Receipts and Coffins from Deir el Medina

by
Dr. Kathlyn Cooney
Stanford University

Date: Sunday, January 18, 2003
Time: 2:30 p.m.
Place: 370 Dwinelle Hall
UC Berkeley Campus

A donation of $5 per person ($3 per
student) is requested to offset the
cost of the lecture.

||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
American Research Center in Egypt
Northern California Chapter
P. O. Box 11352
Berkeley, CA 94712-2352

Website: http://home.comcast.net/%7Ehebsed/lectures.htm

For more information please call 510-527-9746
or send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu
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***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2004-02-06 19:20:19 UTC
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The Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt
and the Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley,
present the lecture

Houses for Eternity and Offerings for the Ka:
Egyptian Burial Practices in the Middle Kingdom

by
Dr. Denise Doxey
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

PLEASE NOTE THE ROOM CHANGE!

Date: Sunday, February 15, 2004
Time: 2:30 p.m.
Place: 155 Dwinelle Hall
UC Berkeley Campus

A donation of $5 per person ($3 per
student) is requested to offset the
cost of the lecture.

||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
American Research Center in Egypt
Northern California Chapter
P. O. Box 11352
Berkeley, CA 94712-2352

Website: http://home.comcast.net/%7Ehebsed/lectures.htm

For more information please call 510-527-9746
or send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu
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***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2004-02-17 21:12:30 UTC
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Those of you in the San Francisco Bay Area who have an
interest in Egyptology might enjoy the following course,
offered to the public through the Stanford Continuing
Studies program, on the Stanford University campus. I have
taken instruction from Joe before, and enthusiastically
recommend this. For those of you NOT living in the San
Francisco Bay Area, my apologies, but I have few other means
to get the word out.

Note that enrollment for the class begins Feb. 23, and
there is tuition.

Glenn
The Rosetta Stone, King Tut, & the Story of Egyptology (ARC 112)
The civilization of Ancient Egypt has been an object of
fascination throughout history, but the first systematic European
exploration of Egypt began in the late 18th century by a small
team of French scholars who accompanied Napoleon's military
expedition through the Nile Valley. In this course we will
explore the history of the European exploration of Egypt, from
those early scholars, to the 19th-century expeditions that took
place against a backdrop of collecting (and looting), to the
deciphering of the Rosetta Stone and the foundation of modern
Egyptology. This is a story filled with great discovery that has
never ceased to fuel the popular imagination--the first great
"media event" in the history of Egyptology was Howard Carter's
discovery of the tomb of Tutankhamun in 1922. But it is also a
story of intrigue, betrayal, unforgettable personalities, and
competing national claims. We will meet some of the great
personalities, read their journals, visit ancient sites, and
explore other aspects of this most fascinating of subjects.
Joseph Manning
Associate Professor of Ancient History
Joe Manning received his PhD from the Oriental Institute at the
University of Chicago. He is a specialist in Greek and demotic
papyrology and economic history, and taught at Princeton
University before coming to Stanford. He is a former fellow at
the Institute for Research in the Humanities, University of
Wisconsin, and was also a National Fellow at the Hoover
Institution. He has lived and traveled extensively in Egypt.
Course Details

Course Code: ARC112

Thursdays
7:00 - 8:50 p.m.
10 weeks
Apr 1 - Jun 3
2 units $345


Register on Feb 23

Register at

http://continuingstudies.stanford.edu/registration/cart.asp

How do I register for a course?
Continuing Studies accepts registrations online, by fax, by mail,
or in person. A registration form can be downloaded and sent in
as follows:
Fax: (650) 725-4248
On-line: http://continuingstudies.stanford.edu/registration
Mail/In person:
482 Galvez Street
Stanford, CA 94305-6079

Continuing Studies Office Hours

Monday - Friday

8:30 a.m. - 12:00 Noon;
1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Phone (650) 725-2650
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Glenn Meyer ANE/Egyptology Enthusiast
Card-Carrying Member of the ACLU Computer Graphics SW Engineer
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Glenn Meyer
2004-06-21 01:07:24 UTC
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Those of you in the San Francisco Bay Area who have an
interest in Egyptian history and culture should take the
following course, offered through UC Berkeley Extension
and taught by Dr. Terry Moore. Dr. Moore has taught for
UC Berkeley Extension since at least 1992. Her teaching of
and enthusiasm for Ancient Egypt has inspired a number of
students, and can be credited with bringing together the
people who started the Northern California chapter of the
American Research Center in Egypt.

Note that enrollment for the class is underway, and
there is tuition. A course description follows. For
information on enrollment, go to

http://www.unex.berkeley.edu/cat/014894.html

and click on the "enroll" link.


Glenn

-----------------

Magicians, Monks, and Martyrs: Byzantine and Roman Egypt
X130.2 (2 semester units in Anthropology)

Egypt in the Roman and Byzantine periods (30 B.C.-A.D. 642)
presents myriad fascinating faces. To the reader of popular
literature in the early imperial period, it was the exotic
land of sorcerers and brigands; to the Roman government, it
was the breadbasket to the Mediterranean; to the first
Christian pilgrims, it was the land of wilderness
monasteries and the gateway to Sinai. To the modern
historian, this period is the source of a wealth of
documents in Egyptian, Greek, and Coptic, preserved by the
desert climate.

This course examines the history and culture of Roman and
Byzantine Egypt from the perspective of modern archaeology,
but also from the texts that describe the richness of
everyday life. You view the arrival of the India
fleet--laden with peppers, silks, and gems--on the Red Sea
coast, visit the colossus of Memnon in the company of the
Emperor Hadrian, spend a day with the brethren at the
monastery of Apap Pachomius, and get to know merchants,
farmers, soldiers, and entertainers. Particular attention is
paid to the development of Christianity in Egypt and the
complex relationships between religions.

TERRY MOORE earned a Ph.D. in Egyptology from UC Berkeley
and teaches UC Berkeley Extension courses in ancient
Egyptian history, language, and culture, along with
additional topics related to the ancient Near East. She has
taught ancient Egyptian language at UC Berkeley and received
fellowships for research in Egypt.

* 10 Saturdays
* July 10 to Sept. 11: Sat., 10 am-1 pm
* Berkeley: 30 Wheeler Hall, UC campus
* $350 (EDP 014894)
midia
2004-06-21 07:06:33 UTC
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Special Report.


http://www.onlinejournal.com/Special_Reports/052104Madsen/052104madsen.html


Karl Rove's White House " Murder, Inc."

By Wayne Madsen
Online Journal Contributing Writer



JUNE, 2004- On September 15, 2001, just four days after the 9-11 attacks,
CIA Director George Tenet provided President [sic] Bush with a Top Secret
"Worldwide Attack Matrix"-a virtual license to kill targets deemed to be a
threat to the United States in some 80 countries around the world. The Tenet
plan, which was subsequently approved by Bush, essentially reversed the
executive orders of four previous U.S. administrations that expressly
prohibited political assassinations.

According to high level European intelligence officials, Bush's counselor,
Karl Rove, used the new presidential authority to silence a popular Lebanese
Christian politician who was planning to offer irrefutable evidence that
Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon authorized the massacre of hundreds of
Palestinian men, women, and children in the Beirut refugee camps of Sabra
and Shatilla in 1982. In addition, Sharon provided the Lebanese forces who
carried out the grisly task. At the time of the massacres, Elie Hobeika was
intelligence chief of Lebanese Christian forces in Lebanon who were battling
Palestinians and other Muslim groups in a bloody civil war. He was also the
chief liaison to Israeli Defense Force (IDF) personnel in Lebanon. An
official Israeli inquiry into the massacre at the camps, the Kahan
Commission, merely found Sharon "indirectly" responsible for the slaughter
and fingered Hobeika as the chief instigator.

The Kahan Commission never called on Hobeika to offer testimony in his
defense. However, in response to charges brought against Sharon before a
special war crimes court in Belgium, Hobeika was urged to testify against
Sharon, according to well-informed Lebanese sources. Hobeika was prepared to
offer a different version of events than what was contained in the Kahan
report. A 1993 Belgian law permitting human rights prosecutions was unusual
in that non-Belgians could be tried for violations against other
non-Belgians in a Belgian court. Under pressure from the Bush
administration, the law was severely amended and the extra territoriality
provisions were curtailed.

Hobeika headed the Lebanese forces intelligence agency since the mid- 1970s
and he soon developed close ties to the CIA. He was a frequent visitor to
the CIA's headquarters at Langley, Virginia. After the Syrian invasion of
Lebanon in 1990, Hobeika held a number of cabinet positions in the Lebanese
government, a proxy for the Syrian occupation authorities. He also served in
the parliament. In July 2001, Hobeika called a press conference and
announced he was prepared to testify against Sharon in Belgium and revealed
that he had evidence of what actually occurred in Sabra and Shatilla.
Hobeika also indicated that Israel had flown members of the South Lebanon
Army (SLA) into Beirut International Airport in an Israeli Air Force C130
transport plane. In full view of dozens of witnesses, including members of
the Lebanese army and others, SLA troops under the command of Major Saad
Haddad were slipped into the camps to commit the massacres. The SLA troops
were under the direct command of Ariel Sharon and an Israeli Mossad agent
provocateur named Rafi Eitan. Hobeika offered evidence that a former U.S.
ambassador to Lebanon was aware of the Israeli plot. In addition, the IDF
had placed a camera in a strategic position to film the Sabra and Shatilla
massacres. Hobeika was going to ask that the footage be released as part of
the investigation of Sharon.

After announcing he was willing to testify against Sharon, Hobeika became
fearful for his safety and began moves to leave Lebanon. Hobeika was not
aware that his threats to testify against Sharon had triggered a series of
fateful events that reached well into the White House and Sharon's office.

On January 24, 2002, Hobeika's car was blown up by a remote controlled bomb
placed in a parked Mercedes along a street in the Hazmieh section of Beirut.
The bomb exploded when Hobeika and his three associates, Fares Souweidan,
Mitri Ajram, and Waleed Zein, were driving their Range Rover past the
TNT-laden Mercedes at 9:40 am Beirut time. The Range Rover's four passengers
were killed in the explosion. In case Hobeika's car had taken another route
through the neighborhood, two additional parked cars, located at two other
choke points, were also rigged with TNT. The powerful bomb wounded a number
of other people on the street. Other parked cars were destroyed and
buildings and homes were damaged. The Lebanese president, prime minister,
and interior minister all claimed that Israeli agents were behind the
attack.

It is noteworthy that the State Department's list of global terrorist
incidents for 2002 worldwide failed to list the car bombing attack on
Hobeika and his party. The White House wanted to ensure the attack was
censored from the report. The reason was simple: the attack ultimately had
Washington's fingerprints on it.

High level European intelligence sources now report that Karl Rove
personally coordinated Hobeika's assassination. The hit on Hobeika employed
Syrian intelligence agents. Syrian President Bashar Assad was trying to
curry favor with the Bush administration in the aftermath of 9-11 and was
more than willing to help the White House. In addition, Assad's father,
Hafez Assad, had been an ally of Bush's father during Desert Storm, a period
that saw Washington give a "wink and a nod" to Syria's occupation of
Lebanon. Rove wanted to help Sharon avoid any political embarrassment from
an in absentia trial in Brussels where Hobeika would be a star witness. Rove
and Sharon agreed on the plan to use Syrian Military Intelligence agents to
assassinate Hobeika. Rove saw Sharon as an indispensable ally of Bush in
ensuring the loyalty of the Christian evangelical and Jewish voting blocs in
the United States. Sharon saw the plan to have the United States coordinate
the hit as a way to mask all connections to Jerusalem.

The Syrian hit team was ordered by Assef Shawkat, the number two man in
Syrian military intelligence and a good friend and brother in law of Syrian
President Bashar Assad. Assad's intelligence services had already cooperated
with U.S. intelligence in resorting to unconventional methods to extract
information from al Qaeda detainees deported to Syria from the United States
and other countries in the wake of 9-11. The order to take out Hobeika was
transmitted by Shawkat to Roustom Ghazali, the head of Syrian military
intelligence in Beirut. Ghazali arranged for the three remote controlled
cars to be parked along Hobeika's route in Hazmieh; only few hundred yards
from the Barracks of Syrian Special Forces which are stationed in the area
near the Presidential palace , the ministry of Defense and various
Government and officers quarters . This particular area is covered 24/7 by a
very sophisticated USA multi-agency surveillance system to monitor Syrian
and Lebanese security activities and is a " Choice " area to live in for its
perceived high security .

The plan to kill Hobeika had all the necessary caveats and built-in denial
mechanisms. If the Syrians were discovered beforehand or afterwards, Karl
Rove and his associates in the Pentagon's Office of Special Plans would be
ensured plausible deniability.

Hobeika's CIA intermediary in Beirut, a man only referred to as "Jason" by
Hobeika, was a frequent companion of the Lebanese politician during official
and off-duty hours. During Hobeika's election campaigns for his
parliamentary seat, Jason was often in Hobeika's office offering support and
advice. After Hobeika's assassination, Jason became despondent over the
death of his colleague. Eventually, Jason disappeared abruptly from Lebanon
and reportedly later emerged in Pakistan.

Karl Rove's involvement in the assassination of Hobeika may not have been
the last "hit" he ordered to help out Sharon. In March 2002, a few months
after Hobeika's assassination, another Lebanese Christian with knowledge of
Sharon's involvement in the Sabra and Shatilla massacres was gunned down
along with his wife in Sao Paulo, Brazil. A bullet fired at Michael Nassar's
car flattened one of his tires. Nassar pulled into a gasoline station for
repairs. A professional assassin, firing a gun with a silencer, shot Nassar
and his wife in the head, killing them both instantly. The assailant fled
and was never captured. Nassar was also involved with the Phalange militia
at Sabra and Shatilla. Nassar was also reportedly willing to testify against
Sharon in Belgium and, as a nephew of SLA Commander General Antoine Lahd,
may have had important evidence to bolster Hobeika's charge that Sharon
ordered SLA forces into the camps to wipe out the Palestinians.

Based on what European intelligence claims is concrete intelligence on
Rove's involvement in the assassination of Hobeika, the Bush administration
can now add political assassination to its laundry list of other misdeeds,
from lying about the reasons to go to war to the torture tactics in
violation of the Geneva Conventions that have been employed by the Pentagon
and "third country" nationals at prisons in Iraq and Guantanamo Bay.

Wayne Madsen is a Washington, DC-based investigative journalist and
columnist. He served in the National Security Agency (NSA) during the Reagan
administration and wrote the introduction to Forbidden Truth. He is the
co-author, with John Stanton, of "America's Nightmare: The Presidency of
George Bush II." His forthcoming book is titled: "Jaded Tasks: Big Oil,
Black Ops, and Brass Plates." Madsen can be reached at:
***@aol.com
Glenn Meyer
2004-02-28 17:22:35 UTC
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I am writing on behalf of the Northern California chapter of the American
Research Center in Egypt, to determine whether there are other Egyptology
interest groups in the San Francisco Bay Area with whom we have not made
contanct, at colleges and elsewhere. We are doing this in the hope of exchanging
information on our activities and yours, sending your our monthly newsletter and
other announcements, and perhaps even jointly arranging to bring in Egyptology
lecturers.

If you belong to or know of any such group, no matter how informal, I would
appreciate any group contact information you are willing to send, to
***@glennmeyer.net. This information will be forwarded to Northern California
ARCE chapter officers, and no one else.

And my apologies to all of you on these lists who are NOT in the San Francisco
Bay Area. Unfortunately the Bay Area does NOT have an Egyptology discussion
group of it's own, that I know of, so I am imposing on these international lists
and disucssions groups to try to comunicate with other Egyptology interest
groups in the Bay Area. I hope you will excuse me.

Sincerely,

Glenn Meyer
Chapter Vice President
Northern California ARCE
Glenn Meyer
2004-04-19 18:15:27 UTC
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The American Research Center in Egypt's Northwest Chapter (ARCE/NW) is
pleased to announce the following slide presentation.
"Jewish Life in Ancient Egypt: A Family Archive from the Nile Valley"
Edward Bleiberg, PhD, Brooklyn Museum of Art
Thursday, April 29, 2004, 6:30pm
Mary Gates Hall, Room 389, University of Washington campus
Admission: FREE.
About the Presentation
This presentation focuses on the private lives of the Jewish temple
official Ananiah, son of Azariah, and his Egyptian wife, Tamut, who both
lived on Elephantine Island in the late 5th century BCE during Persian
rule. Included in the discussion are the arrival of Jews in Egypt after
the destruction of Solomons Temple and the type of Judaism they practiced.
Ananiah and Tamuts family life is discussed from their marriage in 447 BCE
to the final payment on their daughters bride gift in 402 BCE. In-between
these events we learn about marriage, labor conditions, real estate, and
burial in a multi-cultural community of Egyptians, Jews and Persians.
About the Speaker
Edward Bleiberg is Associate Curator in the Department of Egyptian,
Classical and Ancient Middle Eastern Art at the Brooklyn Museum of Art. He
earned his PhD from the University of Toronto in Egyptology. He is
organizing the tour for the exhibition Jewish Life in Ancient Egypt and is
the author of The Official Gift in Ancient Egypt, Ancient Egypt 2615-332
BCE, and the exhibition catalog Jewish Life in Ancient Egypt.
Cosponsors
The Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilization, the Jewish
Studies Program, the Comparative Religion Program, and the Burke Museum of
Natural History and Culture.
Scott Noegel
Dept. Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations
University of Washington
Box 353120
Seattle, WA 98195
Office: 206-543-3606
Dept: 206-543-6033
FAX: 206-685-7936
http://faculty.washington.edu/snoegel/
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Glenn Meyer
2004-04-19 18:22:28 UTC
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NOTE: RESENDING TO REPLACE OLD SUBJECT LINE WITH THE CORRECT ONE.
MY APOLOGIES FOR ANY INCONVENIENCE CAUSED BY MY MISTAKE.

GLENN
The American Research Center in Egypt's Northwest Chapter (ARCE/NW) is
pleased to announce the following slide presentation.
"Jewish Life in Ancient Egypt: A Family Archive from the Nile Valley"
Edward Bleiberg, PhD, Brooklyn Museum of Art
Thursday, April 29, 2004, 6:30pm
Mary Gates Hall, Room 389, University of Washington campus
Admission: FREE.
About the Presentation
This presentation focuses on the private lives of the Jewish temple
official Ananiah, son of Azariah, and his Egyptian wife, Tamut, who both
lived on Elephantine Island in the late 5th century BCE during Persian
rule. Included in the discussion are the arrival of Jews in Egypt after
the destruction of Solomons Temple and the type of Judaism they practiced.
Ananiah and Tamuts family life is discussed from their marriage in 447 BCE
to the final payment on their daughters bride gift in 402 BCE. In-between
these events we learn about marriage, labor conditions, real estate, and
burial in a multi-cultural community of Egyptians, Jews and Persians.
About the Speaker
Edward Bleiberg is Associate Curator in the Department of Egyptian,
Classical and Ancient Middle Eastern Art at the Brooklyn Museum of Art. He
earned his PhD from the University of Toronto in Egyptology. He is
organizing the tour for the exhibition Jewish Life in Ancient Egypt and is
the author of The Official Gift in Ancient Egypt, Ancient Egypt 2615-332
BCE, and the exhibition catalog Jewish Life in Ancient Egypt.
Cosponsors
The Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilization, the Jewish
Studies Program, the Comparative Religion Program, and the Burke Museum of
Natural History and Culture.
Scott Noegel
Dept. Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations
University of Washington
Box 353120
Seattle, WA 98195
Office: 206-543-3606
Dept: 206-543-6033
FAX: 206-685-7936
http://faculty.washington.edu/snoegel/
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Glenn Meyer
2004-04-21 18:01:49 UTC
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The Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt
and the Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley,
present the lecture

The Non-Royal Tombs at Tel Amarna:
Identities in the Details

by
Cindy Ausec
Near Eastern Studies
UC Berkeley

This is the first annual Marie Buttery Memorial Lecture,
in memory of the Northern California chapter's founding
president. Student papers are submitted to the chapter
in competition for this award, which includes an honorarium.

Date: Sunday, April 25, 2004
Time: 2:30 p.m.
Place: 370 Dwinelle Hall
UC Berkeley Campus

A donation of $5 per person ($3 per
student) is requested to offset the
cost of the lecture.

||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
American Research Center in Egypt
Northern California Chapter
P. O. Box 11352
Berkeley, CA 94712-2352

Website: http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed/lectures.htm

For more information please call 510-527-9746
or send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu
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***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2004-05-08 07:23:31 UTC
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The Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt
and the Rosicrucian Egyptian Museum, San Jose
present the lecture

The Ancient Egyptian Sense of Humor

by
Carol A.R. Andrews
Lecturer in Egyptology
University of London

Date: Sunday, May 23, 2004
Time: 3 p.m.
Place: Rosicrucian Egyptian Museum
1342 Naglee Ave
San Jose, CA. 95151
408-947-3665
Directions: http://www.egyptianmuseum.org/visit/index.html
Admission: $5 per person, at the door

Carol Andrews was Assistant Keeper/Senior Research
Assistant in the Department of Egyptian Antiquities at
the British Museum from 1971 until 2000 and was closely
involved in the Tutankhamun Exhibition held there in
1972. She is Lecturer in Egyptology to the Faculty of
Continuing Education, Birkbeck College, University of
London. She is also the author of a number of books on
mummification, Ancient Egyptian texts and Ancient
Egyptian jewelry, among other topics.

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American Research Center in Egypt
Northern California Chapter
P. O. Box 11352
Berkeley, CA 94712-2352

Website: http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed/lectures.htm

For more information please call 510-527-9746
or send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu
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***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2004-05-11 16:54:28 UTC
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----- Forwarded Message -----

The American Research Center in Egypt's Northwest Chapter (ARCE/NW) is
pleased to announce the following slide presentation.

"The Ancient Egyptian Sense of Humor"
Carol A.R. Andrews, Lecturer in Egyptology, University of London

Monday, May 17, 2004
6:30 PM
University of Washington Campus, Miller Hall 301
Admission: FREE.

About the presentation
What exactly made the ancient Egyptians laugh? This extensively
illustrated lecture will consider the likeliest candidates from all
periods of dynastic history. Although many examples are pictorial, a
surprising number are found in written sources. Carol Andrews will also
explore the possibility that what we find amusing in ancient Egyptian
culture might not always have been considered so by the Egyptians
themselves.

About the speaker
Carol Andrews was Assistant Keeper/Senior Research Assistant in the
Department of Egyptian Antiquities at the British Museum from 1971 until
2000 and was closely involved in the Tutankhamun Exhibition held there in
1972. She is Lecturer in Egyptology to the Faculty of Continuing
Education, Birkbeck College, University of London.

Cosponsors
Cosponsored with the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilization
and the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture.

Scott Noegel, President ARCE/NW

Dept. Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations
University of Washington
Box 353120
Seattle, WA 98195

Office: 206-543-3606
Dept: 206-543-6033
FAX: 206-685-7936
http://faculty.washington.edu/snoegel/

----- End of Forwarded Message -----

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***@glennmeyer.net
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King Merenptah
2004-05-26 05:31:56 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Subject: ARCE/NW (Seattle) lecture: Ancient Egyptian Sense of Humor
Date: 5/11/04 9:54 AM Pacific Daylight Time
----- Forwarded Message -----
The American Research Center in Egypt's Northwest Chapter (ARCE/NW) is
pleased to announce the following slide presentation.
"The Ancient Egyptian Sense of Humor"
Carol A.R. Andrews, Lecturer in Egyptology, University of London
Monday, May 17, 2004
6:30 PM
University of Washington Campus, Miller Hall 301
Admission: FREE.
About the presentation
What exactly made the ancient Egyptians laugh? This extensively
illustrated lecture will consider the likeliest candidates from all
periods of dynastic history. Although many examples are pictorial, a
surprising number are found in written sources. Carol Andrews will also
explore the possibility that what we find amusing in ancient Egyptian
culture might not always have been considered so by the Egyptians
themselves.
About the speaker
Carol Andrews was Assistant Keeper/Senior Research Assistant in the
Department of Egyptian Antiquities at the British Museum from 1971 until
2000 and was closely involved in the Tutankhamun Exhibition held there in
1972. She is Lecturer in Egyptology to the Faculty of Continuing
Education, Birkbeck College, University of London.
Cosponsors
Cosponsored with the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilization
and the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture.
Scott Noegel, President ARCE/NW
Dept. Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations
University of Washington
Box 353120
Seattle, WA 98195
With all due respect, I've seen Ms. Andrews' lecture and would suggest she
discontinue her presentation in monotone. A few people actually nodded off a
couple of times. Honestly, the only thing humorous about her presentation was
her high-pitched voice in monotone that would make a baby cry.

Basically, her presentation was a story about mythology in a sense. I didn't
understand some of her slides of ancient art that I've never seen in any of my
Egyptian books, which I have plenty, but ancient art that was possibly from
another geographical location intermixed with slides of ancient Egyptian art
from ancient Egyptian bas-reliefs. Ms. Andrews painted a picture she wanted us
to see but I had a hard time putting it all together.

Just my point of view...

King MerenPTAH
Glenn Meyer
2004-06-09 18:16:42 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
I am looking for a copy of the 1969 Egyptian film
Al-Mumia/"The Night of Counting the Years," based on
the story around the discovery of a cache of Pharaonic
mummies in the later 1800s, a find probably more
significant than the discovery of King Tut's tomb.
(http://film.society.tripod.com/nzffs/abd-night-of-counting-the-years.htm).
The film must have English subtitles, preferably on
digital media, though ANY media will be okay, for rent
or for sale.

Does anyone know where I can find this film?

Thanks!

Glenn
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Glenn Meyer ANE/Egyptology Enthusiast
Card-Carrying Member of the ACLU Computer Graphics SW Engineer
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Glenn Meyer
2004-08-14 08:39:45 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
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The Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt
and the Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley,
present the lecture

Excavations in the Valley of the Kings:
Prospects for the Future

by
Dr. Geoffrey Martin
The Amarna Research Project
University College, London

Date: Sunday, August 29, 2004
Time: 2:30 p.m.
Place: 370 Dwinelle Hall
UC Berkeley Campus

Chapter officers will be elected by voice vote at this meeting.

A donation of $5 per person ($3 per
student) is requested to offset the
cost of the lecture.

||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
American Research Center in Egypt
Northern California Chapter
P. O. Box 11352
Berkeley, CA 94712-2352

Website: http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed/lectures.htm

For more information please call 510-527-9746
or send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu
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***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2004-08-27 16:20:50 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
-------- Original Message --------
Subject: ARCE/NW lecture Lucie Duff Gordon
Date: Mon, 23 Aug 2004 12:08:16 -0700 (PDT)
From: Scott Noegel <***@u.washington.edu>
To: scott noegel <***@u.washington.edu>

For immediate release please.

The American Research Center in Egypt (Northwest) is pleased to announce
the upcoming presentation.

Event: Brian Hunt to speak on Lucie Duff Gordon in Egypt
When: Thursday, September 2, 2004, 6:30pm
Where: Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture.
Admission: FREE.

About the presentation
She was a contemporary and friend of Dickens, Carlyle, Tennyson,
Thackeray, and all the intellectual luminaries of her day. She was known
as one of London's most charming hostesses. From life at the center of
mid-19th century English high society, Lucie Duff Gordon was exiled by bad
health to Egypt, a land so foreign that most Europeans were glad to go
home after a quick dash up the Nile. Instead, Lucie found a new life as
the queen of Upper Egypt, much loved by the fellahin whose language,
customs, and religion she learned and admired over her seven years there.
Her Letters From Egypt became a best seller and brought her fame (for
which she had little use). Come learn more about the life of this
remarkable Victorian.

About the speaker
Brian Hunt is a local writer with a long-standing interest in both ancient
and modern Egypt. He has served on a number of archaeological excavations,
most recently with Mark Lehner on the Gizeh Plateau, and is currently
working on a screenplay about Lucie Duff Gordon's life in Egypt.

Co-sponsor: Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilization

Contact: Scott Noegel, President ARCE/NW
Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilization
Box 353120
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195
Phone: 206-543-3606
Fax: 206-685-7936
http://faculty.washington.edu/snoegel/
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Glenn Meyer
2004-08-27 17:14:57 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
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Fall 2004 Lecture Schedule

Sponsored by
The Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt,
The Department of Near Eastern Studies, U. C. Berkeley
and The Center For Middle Eastern Studies, U. C. Berkeley

Location for All Meetings:
Room 370 Dwinelle Hall
UC Berkeley Campus
All meetings are Sunday at 2:30 p.m.

--
August 29, 2004

Excavations in the Valley of the Kings:
Prospects for the Future

Dr. Geoffrey Martin
University College, London
and The Amarna Research Project

--
September 26, 2004

On the Iconography of Set Images

Dr. Eugene Cruz-Uribe
University of Northern Arizona

--
October 24, 2004

Virtual Cairo

Dr. Nezar al Sayyed
Center for Middle Eastern Studies
U. C. Berkeley


--
November 21, 2004

The Changing Role of Women in Egypt Today

Dr. Elizabeth Fernea
University of Texas

--
December 5, 2004

Annual Holiday Party and Suq

A film or slideshow is being prepared

--

A donation of $5 per person ($3 per
student) is requested to offset the
cost of the lecture.

||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
American Research Center in Egypt
Northern California Chapter
P. O. Box 11352
Berkeley, CA 94712-2352

Website: http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed/lectures.htm

For more information please call 510-527-9746
or send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu
||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2004-09-19 15:37:29 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
The Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt,
the Department of Near Eastern Studies, U.C. Berkeley,
and the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, U.C. Berkeley,
present the lecture

On the Iconography of Set Images

by
Dr. Eugene Cruz-Uribe
Northern Arizona University

Date: Sunday, September 26, 2004
Time: 2:30 p.m.
Place: 370 Dwinelle Hall
U.C. Berkeley Campus

The lecture will focus on the types of iconographic representations
of Seth that we have from throughout Egyptian history and what they
can tell us about the role that Seth played in Egyptian religion.
Slides of material discovered during a recent trip to Egypt will be
included in the talk.

Eugene Cruz-Uribe is currently a Full Professor of History at
Northern Arizona University. Cruz has been at NAU for fifteen years,
including time as Associate Dean in the College of Social and
Behavioral Sciences. Trained as an Egyptologist (BA, MA, PHD at the
University of Chicago), he has continued his research activities in
the languages, religion and history of Egypt. He is currently
working on a field project analyzing the nature of ancient graffiti,
especially in temple and quarry sites. He has been a grant reviewer
for the NEH, the NSF, and the Arizona Humanities Council. He is
currently on the Board of Directors of the Arizona Humanities Council
(Governor's Appointee) and on the Board of Trustees for the Society
for the Study of Egyptian Antiquity (Toronto, CA). Cruz enjoys
singing in the choir at San Francisco de Asis parish in Flagstaff.
He is married to Kathy Cruz-Uribe, a professor of anthropology and
Dean of the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences at NAU. They
have two children, Alicia and Mariana.

A donation of $5 per person ($3 per
student) is requested to offset the
cost of the lecture.

||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
American Research Center in Egypt
Northern California Chapter
P. O. Box 11352
Berkeley, CA 94712-2352

Website: http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed/lectures.htm

For more information please call 510-527-9746
or send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu
||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2004-09-22 22:31:42 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Confirmed AESA Seminars in Seattle, 2004-05 season:

T.G.H. James, "A Lifetime in Egyptology ": November 5 ( Friday) at
7:00 pm, Kane Hall, U.Washington. Room # 110.

Donald B. Redford, "New Discoveries at Mendes in the Nile Delta":
January 15 (Saturday) at 2:00 pm, Seattle Art Museum, Downtown

Aidan Dodson," The Tomb of Osiris at Abydos" April 2 (Saturday)
or 3 (Sunday), at 2:00 pm, Seattle Art Museum. Exact date to be
announced.

Benson Harer, M.D., "Mummies and Medicine" May 14 (Saturday) or 15
(Sunday), at 2pm, Seattle Art Museum Exact date to be announced.

Salima Ikram, June 11 (Saturday) or 12 (Sunday), at 2:00
pm. Seattle Art Museum Exact date and title to be announced.

Tickets for all lectures are free for members of AESA ( and members of
Seattle Art Museum, where applicable), $5:00 for nonmembers.

ABOUT THE AESA:

The Ancient Egypt Studies Association (AESA) is a Pacific
Northwest organization that promotes the study and understanding
of ancient Egypt. The AESA offers lectures and study groups in
Seattle and Portland, as well as our well-received quarterly
newsletter, The Scroll. You don't have to live in the Pacific
Northwest to join! We welcome amateurs and professionals alike.

Carol Andrews, Lanny Bell, Aidan Dodson, Zahi Hawass, Salima
Ikram, T.G.H. "Harry" James, Geoffrey Martin, Nicholas Reeves,
Donald P. Ryan, Nigel Strudwick, Emily Teeter, and Frank Yurco are
just a few of the Egyptologists who have lectured for the AESA.

HOW TO CONTACT US

Ancient Egypt Studies Association
927 NE 175th Avenue
Portland OR 97230

aesa-***@attbi.com
http://www.aesa-nw.org/
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***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2004-11-15 01:45:50 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
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The Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt,
the Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley,
and the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley,
present the lecture

The Changing Role of Women in the Family in Egypt Today

by
Dr. Elizabeth Fernea
University of Texas

Date: Sunday, November 21, 2004
Time: 2:30 p.m.
Place: 370 Dwinelle Hall
UC Berkeley Campus

Sales for the annual Holiday Suq
begin at 1 p.m. and continue after the program.

A donation of $5 per person ($3 per
student) is requested to offset the
cost of the lecture.

||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
American Research Center in Egypt
Northern California Chapter
P. O. Box 11352
Berkeley, CA 94712-2352

Website: http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed/lectures.htm

For more information please call 510-527-9746
or send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu
||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2004-12-07 06:36:22 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
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The American Research Center in Egypt, Northern California Chapter,
and the Near Eastern Studies Department, U.C. Berkeley, announce the

Annual Holiday Party and Suq

Sunday, 12th of December, 2004
1-4:30 PM
Room 370 Dwinelle Hall
U.C. Berkeley Campus

The party will include the video
"How the Pyramids Were Built", on DVD.
Please feel free to bring food to share
with the others.

||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
American Research Center in Egypt
Northern California Chapter
P. O. Box 11352
Berkeley, CA 94712-2352

Website: http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed/lectures.htm

For more information please call 510-527-9746
or send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu
||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2004-12-09 07:17:48 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
I am resending the following announcement to correct the content of the
video program. My apologies for any inconvenience caused by my error.

Glenn


||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||

The American Research Center in Egypt, Northern California Chapter,
and the Near Eastern Studies Department, U.C. Berkeley, announce the

Annual Holiday Party and Suq

Sunday, 12th of December, 2004
1-4:30 PM
Room 370 Dwinelle Hall
U.C. Berkeley Campus

At the party two videos will be shown:
"Living with the Past," Dr. Elizabeth
Fernea's documentary on Cairo, and
"Nefertiti Resurrected," Joann Fletcher's
controversial assessment of the mummy
found in the tomb of Amenhotep II
Please feel free to bring food to share
with the others.

||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
American Research Center in Egypt
Northern California Chapter
P. O. Box 11352
Berkeley, CA 94712-2352

Website: http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed/lectures.htm

For more information please call 510-527-9746
or send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu
||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2005-01-25 19:11:22 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Tue, 25 Jan 2005 09:12:28 -0800 (PST)
From: Scott Noegel <***@u.washington.edu>
Subject: ARCE/NW event: Egyptologist to speak at UW

For immediate release please:

The American Research Center in Egypt's Northwest Chapter is pleased to
announce the following event.

When: February 3, 6:30 PM

Who: Jacqueline Jay, University of Chicago

Title: "He Knew My Character: Glimpses of Personality in Ancient Egyptian
Literary Tales."

Where: At the Burke Museum, University of Washington

Admission: FREE

In the Egyptian Tale of Sinuhe, the Asiatic ruler Amunenshi assures the
fugitive Sinuhe, saying, You will be happy with me. According to Sinuhe,
He said this because he knew my character. The ancient Egyptians were
obviously well aware of one another's individual character traits; indeed,
the Late Period Instruction of Onchsheshonqy counsels that A man's
character is on his face. Through actions and speech, ancient Egyptian
literary protagonists display facets of their personalities, both good and
bad. Sinuhe, the Shipwrecked Sailor, and Setne, among others--all are
three-dimensional, flawed individuals. By examining the very different
personality traits exhibited by the characters of Egyptian literature, we
may gain a better understanding of how the ancient Egyptians perceived and
portrayed themselves.

Jackie Jay is completing her PhD dissertation in Egyptology at the
University of Chicago. She is on the staff of the Chicago Demotic
Dictionary project at the University of Chicago, and spent the past summer
at Berkeley working with unpublished Demotic texts.

Co-sponsored by the Burke Museum of Cultural History and the Department of
Near Eastern Languages and Civilization at the University of Washington.


Best,

Scott Noegel (ARCE/NW)

Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilization
Box 353120
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195
Phone: 206-543-3606
Fax: 206-685-7936
http://faculty.washington.edu/snoegel/
Glenn Meyer
2005-02-14 06:40:15 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
The Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt
and the Department of Near Eastern Studies, U.C. Berkeley,
present the lecture

Tebtunis:
Crocodile Mummies,
the Garden of Eden
and Fascist Archaeology

by
Dr. Ian Begg
Trent University

Date: Sunday, February 27, 2005
Time: 2:30 p.m.
Place: 370 Dwinelle Hall
U.C. Berkeley Campus

A donation of $5 per person ($3 per
student) is requested to offset the
cost of the lecture.

||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
American Research Center in Egypt
Northern California Chapter
P. O. Box 11352
Berkeley, CA 94712-2352

Website: http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed/lectures.htm

For more information please call 510-527-9746
or send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu
||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2005-03-04 07:30:33 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
For immediate release please:

The American Research Center in Egypt (Northwest) is pleaseD to announce
the following event.

Dr. Eugene Cruz-Uribe, Northern Arizona University

"New Developments on the Seth Front: New Scenes for Old"

When: Monday, March 7 6:30 PM
Where: Room 301, Miller Hall, University of Washington
Admission: FREE

About the presentation:
The presentation will focus on efforts to identify or reconsider a variety
of images of the god Seth and how they offer a new understanding of the
role Seth played in Egyptian religion. Several recently discovered views
of Seth will be examined.

About the speaker:
Dr. Eugene Cruz-Uribe is currently Full Professor of History at Northern
Arizona University. Cruz has been at NAU for fifteen years, including
time as Associate Dean in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences.
Trained as an Egyptologist (BA, MA, PHD at the University of Chicago), he
has continued his research activities in the languages, religion and
history of that ancient land. He is currently working on a field project
analyzing the nature of ancient graffiti, especially in temple and quarry
sites. He has served as a grant reviewer for NEH and NSF as well as a
one-year stint reviewing grants for the Arizona Humanities Council. He is
currently on the Board of Directors of the Arizona Humanities Council
(Governor's Appointee) and on the Board of Trustees for the Society for
the Study of Egyptian Antiquity (Toronto, CA).

Sponsors: ARCE/NW and the Department of Near Eastern Languages and
Civilization at the University of Washington.


Best,

Scott Noegel President ARCE/NW

Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilization
Box 353120
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195
Phone: 206-543-3606
Fax: 206-685-7936
http://faculty.washington.edu/snoegel/
Glenn Meyer
2005-03-06 06:41:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
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The Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt
and the Department of Near Eastern Studies, U.C. Berkeley,
present the Marie Buttery Memorial Lecture

An Interpretation of the Motifs
on the Tomb Walls and in the Shrines
of the Tomb of Tutankhamun

by
Sean Pyne, Graduate Student
Near Eastern Studies
U.C. Berkeley

NOTE THE LOCATION CHANGE!!!

Date: Sunday, March 13, 2005
Time: 2:30 p.m.
Place: NES Lounge, 2nd Floor Barrows Hall
U.C. Berkeley Campus

A donation of $5 per person ($3 per
student) is requested to help offset the
cost of the lecture.

||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
American Research Center in Egypt
Northern California Chapter
P. O. Box 11352
Berkeley, CA 94712-2352

Website: http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed/lectures.htm

For more information please call 510-527-9746
or send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu
||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2005-03-07 05:58:02 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
The following replaces the previous posting, correcting the speaker's
student
status and explaining the Marie Buttery Memorial Lecture award.

||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
The Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt
and the Department of Near Eastern Studies, U.C. Berkeley,
present the Marie Buttery Memorial Lecture
(awarded for the best student paper submitted)

An Interpretation of the Motifs
on the Tomb Walls and in the Shrines
of the Tomb of Tutankhamun

by
Sean Pyne, Undergraduate
Near Eastern Studies
U.C. Berkeley

NOTE THE LOCATION CHANGE!!!

Date: Sunday, March 13, 2005
Time: 2:30 p.m.
Place: NES Lounge, 2nd Floor Barrows Hall
U.C. Berkeley Campus

A donation of $5 per person ($3 per
student) is requested to help offset the
cost of the lecture.

||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
American Research Center in Egypt
Northern California Chapter
P. O. Box 11352
Berkeley, CA 94712-2352

Website: http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed/lectures.htm

For more information please call 510-527-9746
or send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu
||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
***@glennmeyer.net
||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
Glenn Meyer
2005-03-07 06:32:55 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
The following replaces the previous posting, correcting the speaker's
student status and explaining the Marie Buttery Memorial Lecture.

||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
The Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt
and the Department of Near Eastern Studies, U.C. Berkeley,
present the Marie Buttery Memorial Lecture
(awarded for the best student paper submitted)

An Interpretation of the Motifs
on the Tomb Walls and in the Shrines
of the Tomb of Tutankhamun

by
Sean Pyne, Undergraduate
Near Eastern Studies
U.C. Berkeley

NOTE THE LOCATION CHANGE!!!

Date: Sunday, March 13, 2005
Time: 2:30 p.m.
Place: NES Lounge, 2nd Floor Barrows Hall
U.C. Berkeley Campus

A donation of $5 per person ($3 per
student) is requested to help offset the
cost of the lecture.

||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
American Research Center in Egypt
Northern California Chapter
P. O. Box 11352
Berkeley, CA 94712-2352

Website: http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed/lectures.htm

For more information please call 510-527-9746
or send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu
||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2004-10-14 02:08:50 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
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The Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt,
the Department of Near Eastern Studies, U.C. Berkeley,
and the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, U.C. Berkeley,
present the lecture

Virtual Cairo

by
Professor Nezar AlSayyad
Department of Architecture,
and Center for Middle Eastern Studies
U.C. Berkeley

Date: Sunday, October 24, 2004
Time: 2:30 p.m.
Place: 370 Dwinelle Hall
U.C. Berkeley Campus

A donation of $5 per person ($3 per
student) is requested to offset the
cost of the lecture.

||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
American Research Center in Egypt
Northern California Chapter
P. O. Box 11352
Berkeley, CA 94712-2352

Website: http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed/lectures.htm

For more information please call 510-527-9746
or send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu
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***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2004-10-26 19:13:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
For Immediate Relase please:

The American Research Center in Egypt's Northwest Chapter
is pleased to announce the following event:

When: November 4, 6:30 PM
Who: Dr. Stephen Garfinkle, Western Washington University

"Egypt and Mesopotamia in the Fourteenth Century BC: Ancient
Diplomacy in an International Era."

Where: At the Burke Museum, University of Washington
Admission: FREE

About the presentation

In 1887 AD, Bedouins discovered a cache of clay tablets at
el-Amarna on the eastern bank of the Nile, about 190 miles
south of Cairo. The tablets became known as the Amarna
letters, and they constitute part of the royal diplomatic
correspondence of the Egyptian pharaohs. The discovery of
the Amarna tablets opened a window into the foreign affairs
of the Egyptian empire in the Fourteenth Century BC, and
cast a spotlight on international relations 3,500 years
ago. The texts themselves were written primarily in
Akkadian, which was the language of Babylonia, and is one of
the oldest written languages in the world. This presentation
will use the text of the letters, along with images from
archaeological excavations, to explore the diplomatic,
dynastic, and commercial connections between Egypt and
Mesopotamia during the late Bronze Age.


About the speaker

Dr. Steven Garfinkle is Assistant Professor of History at
Western Washington University, where he teaches a full range
of courses on the Ancient Near East. He received his PhD in
Ancient Near Eastern Studies from Columbia University. His
current research focuses on the society and economy of
Mesopotamia in the Third and Second Millennia BC., and he
has published several articles on Mesopotamian society and
economy. He has just completed work on an edition of the Ur
III Tablets from the Columbia University Library (with
H. Sauren and M. Van De Mieroop), and he is revising a
study of entrepreneurs at the end of the Third Millennium
BC.

Best,

Scott Noegel, President ARCE/NW

Dept. Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations
University of Washington
Box 353120
Seattle, WA 98195

Office: 206-543-3606
Dept: 206-543-6033
FAX: 206-685-7936
http://faculty.washington.edu/snoegel/

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***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2004-12-14 20:21:19 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
The AESA is proud to present
Donald B. Redford
NEW DISCOVERIES AT MENDES IN THE NILE DELTA

Date: January 15, 2005
Time: 2:00 pm
Where: Seattle Art Museum, Downtown
Admission: Free for AESA and SAM members, $5 all others


Professor Redford has been excavating at Mendes for 13
years, and a flood of new light has been cast on many
periods of Egypt's history. The city is one of the oldest
and longest-lived of any in Egypt: its foundation dates to
prehistoric times (4th or 5th millennium B.C.), and it
remained a thriving town into the Middle Ages. Key
discoveries include: examples of early writing found in
houses of 3000 B.C., dramatic evidence of a massacre and a
conflagration 2200 B.C., shrine of the fish-goddess and the
burying ground of the sacred rams, violent destruction by
the Persians 343 B.C., crucifixions of the late first
century B.C.

Professor Redford was professor of Near Eastern Studies at
the Univ. of Toronto. On retirement from that position, he
moved to Penn State Univ., and still continues his
excavations in the Nile delta. He has published numerous
books, the latest on Mendes coming out shortly, and has
prepared a film on his Akhenaten temple project.

Tickets are available at the SAM Ticket Counter. For more
information, please contact ***@comcast.net or
206.722.9171 .

This lecture is co-sponsored by the AESA and the Seattle Art
Museum
Glenn Meyer
2005-04-04 04:42:48 UTC
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Raw Message
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The Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt
and the Department of Near Eastern Studies, U.C. Berkeley,
present the lecture

Who's Your Mummy?
Working with the Dead at El Hibeh, Egypt

by
Dr. Robert Yohe
Assistant Professor of Anthropology
California State University, Bakersfield

NOTE THE LOCATION CHANGE!!!

Date: Sunday, April 17, 2005
Time: 2:30 p.m.
Place: NES Lounge, 2nd Floor Barrows Hall
U.C. Berkeley Campus

A donation of $5 per person ($3 per
student) is requested to help offset the
cost of the lecture.

||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
American Research Center in Egypt
Northern California Chapter
P. O. Box 11352
Berkeley, CA 94712-2352

Website: http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed/lectures.htm

For more information please call 510-527-9746
or send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu
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***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2005-04-05 00:16:21 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
----- Forwarded message -----
The American Research Center in Egypt's Northwest Chapter (ARCE/NW) is
pleased to announce the following Egyptology lecture.
Who: Dr. Gay Robins, Emory University
What: Women, Sexuality, and the Construction of Gender in New Kingdom Art.
When: April 7, 6:30 PM
Where: Burke Museum, University of Washington
Admission: FREE
This presentation aims to examine how sexuality and gender is constructed
in representations of women in New Kingdom Egyptian art, and to explore
what this tells us about how men and women were perceived as relating to
each other within society. Before drawing any conclusions, one must be
aware of problems inherent in the material. What is shown in the visual
material is an idealized system that reflects the views of the elite male
ruling group for whom the art was produced. This elite system was
presumably grounded in actual social structure but, as texts show, the
lived realities of that structure were far messier than the elite ideal.
Thus what Dr. Robins will explore is an elite construct relating to
reality but not reality. In examining this elite system, she shall analyze
differences between the ways in which male and female elite figures are
represented, for instance, with regard to skin color, pose, costume, items
carried, and location within scenes, in order to show how male and female
identity and sexuality are constructed in opposition to one another. She
shall also examine how images of elite figures compare to those of the
non-elite and whether status affects the construction of sexuality and
gender. She shall suggest ways how we can use the visual evidence to draw
conclusions about positive and negative aspects of the position of elite
women within New Kingdom Egyptian society.
Dr. Gay Robins studied Egyptology as an undergraduate at the University of
Durham, England, and then went to Oxford to undertake research on queens
of the Eighteenth Dynasty, obtaining a D.Phil. in 1981. From 1979 to 1983
she was the Lady Wallis Budge Research Fellow in Egyptology at Christ's
College, Cambridge. She is now Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of Art
History at Emory University and Faculty Consultant for Ancient Egyptian
Art in the Michael C. Carlos Museum. She has published numerous
articles relating to ancient Egyptian art, women and gender issues in
ancient Egypt, and the living stature and physical proportions of the
ancient Egyptians. She is the author of Egyptian Painting and Relief
(1986), Women in Ancient Egypt (1993), Proportion and Style in Ancient
Egyptian Art (1994), The Art of Ancient Egypt (1997), and Egyptian Statues
(2001). She is currently writing a book on non-royal 18th dynasty Theban
rock-cut tombs.
Best,
Scott Noegel (ARCE/NW President)
Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilization
Box 353120
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195
Phone: 206-543-3606
Fax: 206-685-7936
http://faculty.washington.edu/snoegel/
--
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***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2005-04-05 00:23:49 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
The following message was sent out under the wrong subject heading.
Instead of

"Re: Northern Cal. ARCE/UCB April 17 lecture: Working with the Dead at El
Hibeh, Egypt"

the subject heading should have been

"ARCE/NW April 7 Lecture: Women and Sexuality in Egyptian Art"

My apologies.

Glenn
Post by Glenn Meyer
----- Forwarded message -----
The American Research Center in Egypt's Northwest Chapter (ARCE/NW) is
pleased to announce the following Egyptology lecture.
Who: Dr. Gay Robins, Emory University
What: Women, Sexuality, and the Construction of Gender in New Kingdom Art.
When: April 7, 6:30 PM
Where: Burke Museum, University of Washington
Admission: FREE
This presentation aims to examine how sexuality and gender is constructed
in representations of women in New Kingdom Egyptian art, and to explore
what this tells us about how men and women were perceived as relating to
each other within society. Before drawing any conclusions, one must be
aware of problems inherent in the material. What is shown in the visual
material is an idealized system that reflects the views of the elite male
ruling group for whom the art was produced. This elite system was
presumably grounded in actual social structure but, as texts show, the
lived realities of that structure were far messier than the elite ideal.
Thus what Dr. Robins will explore is an elite construct relating to
reality but not reality. In examining this elite system, she shall analyze
differences between the ways in which male and female elite figures are
represented, for instance, with regard to skin color, pose, costume, items
carried, and location within scenes, in order to show how male and female
identity and sexuality are constructed in opposition to one another. She
shall also examine how images of elite figures compare to those of the
non-elite and whether status affects the construction of sexuality and
gender. She shall suggest ways how we can use the visual evidence to draw
conclusions about positive and negative aspects of the position of elite
women within New Kingdom Egyptian society.
Dr. Gay Robins studied Egyptology as an undergraduate at the University of
Durham, England, and then went to Oxford to undertake research on queens
of the Eighteenth Dynasty, obtaining a D.Phil. in 1981. From 1979 to 1983
she was the Lady Wallis Budge Research Fellow in Egyptology at Christ's
College, Cambridge. She is now Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of Art
History at Emory University and Faculty Consultant for Ancient Egyptian
Art in the Michael C. Carlos Museum. She has published numerous
articles relating to ancient Egyptian art, women and gender issues in
ancient Egypt, and the living stature and physical proportions of the
ancient Egyptians. She is the author of Egyptian Painting and Relief
(1986), Women in Ancient Egypt (1993), Proportion and Style in Ancient
Egyptian Art (1994), The Art of Ancient Egypt (1997), and Egyptian Statues
(2001). She is currently writing a book on non-royal 18th dynasty Theban
rock-cut tombs.
Best,
Scott Noegel (ARCE/NW President)
Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilization
Box 353120
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195
Phone: 206-543-3606
Fax: 206-685-7936
http://faculty.washington.edu/snoegel/
--
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***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2005-05-05 20:47:32 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
The American Research Center in Egypt's Northwest Chapter (ARCE/NW) is
pleased to announce the following Egyptology Arts lecture:

Who: Dr. Rita Freed, Boston Museum of Fine Arts
What: "Fakes and Flops in Sculpture of the Pyramid Age"
When: May 12 (Thursday), 6:30 PM
Where: Sieg Hall 134, University of Washington Capus
Admission: FREE

About the presentation:
Those of us who are frequent museum visitors are exposed to the best of
the best, particularly in institutions like the Museum of Fine Arts,
Boston. Accordingly we have a tendency to think, especially with regard
to ancient art, that every sculptor was a master. Anything that is not
beautiful or falls outside the way we think ancient art should look, we
tend to condemn as a forgery.

At the MFA, because it excavated its Egyptian collection, it is
privileged to have not only the masterpieces we display, but also many
other things. In this brief presentation, I will show sculptures that
nearly everybody, dealers included, would assume were not ancient had we
not excavated them!

On the other hand, we tend to assume that the manufacture of forgeries is
a recent occupation. That is also untrue, as one of the earliest Egyptian
antiquities to arrive on Boston's shore will demonstrate.

About the speaker:
Dr. Rita E. Freed, Norma-Jean Calderwood Curator of Ancient Egyptian,
Nubian, and Near Eastern Art and Joint Head of the Department of Art of
the Ancient World at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA), is an
international authority on Egyptian art. Freed was appointed Curator of
Egyptian, Nubian and Near Eastern Art at the MFA in 1989, a position
endowed by Norma-Jean and Stanford Calderwood in 1997. Since 1990, she
has also served as Adjunct Professor of Art at Wellesley College.

Most recently, Freed has organized the international traveling exhibition
Pharaohs of the Sun: Akhenaten, Nefertiti, Tutankhamen (premiering at
the MFA from November 14, 1999 through February 6, 2000) which is among
the largest and most important examinations of Egypt's Amarna Period.
Freed also oversees one of the most impressive collections of Egyptian
art outside of Cairo, and in August 1998, she reinstalled two
award-winning galleries at the MFA, the Egyptian Funerary Arts and Art of
the Ancient Near East. These galleries, which house nearly 700 objects,
allow visitors to step into the mystical and ancient worlds of Egypt and
Babylon in beautifully designed, state-of-the-art exhibition spaces.
From 1985 to 1987, Freed curated Ramses the Great, an exhibition that
traveled from the Cairo Museum, and served as a consultant at each of the
exhibition's three venues Museum of Science (Boston, MA), the Mint Museum
(Charlotte, NC), and the Dallas Museum of Natural History. In 1983, Freed
curated A Divine Tour of Ancient Egypt at the University Gallery at the
University of Memphis, where she was an associate professor and served as
the founding director of the Institute of Egyptian Art and Archaeology.

Freed has led numerous Egyptian archaeological excavations. In 1990 and
1992, Freed was Co-Project Director for the Boston-Penn Expeditions in
Bersheh and Saqqara respectively. She worked as an epigrapher in Giza in
1989, and was the small finds registrar in Mitrahineh in 1985 and 1988.
In 1977, Freed was the field archaeologist and expedition photographer at
the Mendes Excavations in the Eastern Delta. Freed first participated in
excavations in 1973 with the Idalion excavations in Cyprus and Tel Qasile
Philistine temple in Israel.

Freed has published numerous articles, dissertations and catalogues. Most
recently, she wrote the introduction for the exhibition catalogue,
Pharaohs of the Sun: Akhenaten, Nefertiti, Tutankhamen, as well as the
Egyptian sculpture section in the Dictionary of Art (Macmillan, London,
1998). In 1992, she co-authored the MFA's Bersheh Reports I. Freed also
wrote the exhibition catalogues Ramses the Great: An Exhibition in the
City of Memphis (1987), A Divine Tour of Ancient Egypt (1983), and Egypt's
Golden Age: The Art of Living in the New Kingdom (1982).

Freed joined the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA) in 1971 as an assistant
to the renowned Curator Emeritus, Dows Dunham. She returned to the MFA,
following college and graduate school, in 1978 as an exhibition assistant
in the Department of Ancient Egyptian, Nubian, and Near Eastern Art.
Freed graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Wellesley College, where she is
currently an adjunct professor, and received her Certificate in Museology,
Master of Arts, and Doctor of Philosophy from the Institute of Fine Arts
at New York University.


Best

Scott Noegel
President ARCE/NW

Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilization
Box 353120
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195
Phone: 206-543-3606
Fax: 206-685-7936
http://faculty.washington.edu/snoegel/
Glenn Meyer
2005-05-01 12:22:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Glenn Meyer
2005-05-04 06:09:53 UTC
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Raw Message
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The Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt
and the Department of Near Eastern Studies, U.C. Berkeley,
present the lecture

Flops and Frauds of Old Kingdom Art

by
Dr. Rita Freed
Boston Museum of Fine Arts

Date: Sunday, May 15, 2005
Time: 2:30 p.m.
Place: 370 Dwinelle Hall
U.C. Berkeley Campus

A donation of $5 per person ($3 per
student) is requested to help offset the
cost of the lecture.

||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
American Research Center in Egypt
Northern California Chapter
P. O. Box 11352
Berkeley, CA 94712-2352

Website: http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed/lectures.htm

For more information please call 510-527-9746
or send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu
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***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2005-05-27 05:44:13 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
<head>
<meta content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type">
<title></title>
</head>
<body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000">
<p align="center"><font size="4"><b>AESA LECTURE</b></font><font
size="1"><br>
</font><font size="5"><b>Salima Ikram</b></font><b><br>
<font size="4">Temples, Tombs and Petroglyphs:</font> North Kharga
Oasis Survey</b> <font size="1"><br>
<big><b>June 11 (Saturday) 2:00 pm,</b> <b>Seattle Art Museum. <br>
</b> Admission: $5, FREE for AESA and SAM members</big></font></p>
<p align="center"><big><font size="1"><big>The North Kharga Oasis
Survey (NKOS) has been working in Kharga <br>
Oasis for 5 years. This little studied oasis has yielded vast amounts
of <br>
information on Egypt's history from the Prehistoric to the Roman
Periods, <br>
with some astonishingly well preserved remains from all periods. The <br>
discoveries in this oasis seriously challenge our preconceptions about <br>
Egypt's history in the areas outside the Nile Valley.<br>
Co-sponsored with Seattle Art Museum<br>
</big></font></big></p>
<p align="center">Contact : Liisa Prehn, 206.722.9171<br>
</p>
<p><font size="1"><br>
</font></p>
</body>
</html>
Glenn Meyer
2005-08-07 00:43:56 UTC
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The Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt
and the Department of Near Eastern Studies, U.C. Berkeley,
present the lecture

On Closer Inspection: The Egyptian Blue Lotus...New Discoveries

by
Jonathan Meader

Date: Sunday, August 21, 2005
Time: 2:30 p.m.
Place: 370 Dwinelle Hall
U.C. Berkeley Campus

NOTE: The meeting will begin with the election of officers

A donation of $5 per person ($3 per
student) is requested to help offset the
cost of the lecture.

||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
American Research Center in Egypt
Northern California Chapter
P. O. Box 11352
Berkeley, CA 94712-2352

Website: http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed/lectures.htm

For more information please call 510-527-9746
or send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu
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***@glennmeyer.net
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*
Glenn Meyer
2005-08-21 05:41:00 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
I would like to recommend the following Egyptology course, which is
offered through UC Berkeley Extension this Fall, on Saturdays, from 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. For more information, you can go to www.unex.berkeley.edu
on the web, or call Extension enrollment at 510-642-4111.

Glenn

From http://www.unex.berkeley.edu/cat/course906.html


NEW THIS TERM


The 18th Dynasty of Egypt

X156 (2 semester units in Near Eastern Studies)

/Planned in conjunction with the exhibition “Daughter of Re: Hatshepsut,
King of Egypt,” de Young Museum, San Francisco/

Hatshepsut, the queen who took the titles of a king, and Tutankhamun,
the young man whose burial astonished the world of archaeology, are
among the best-known rulers of ancient Egypt. But the 18th Dynasty also
included the great warrior and builder Thutmose III, Amenhotep the
Magnificent, and Akhenaten, the “heretic.”

This course takes up the art, architecture, history, and literature of
the 18th Dynasty, attending to primary sources ranging from military
annals to the Book of the Dead, from building dedications to private
letters and autobiographies. Special attention is given to the monuments
of Thebes and relevant museum collections.

The course includes a field trip to the exhibition at the de Young Museum.

*INSTRUCTOR Terry Moore*

* *10 meetings*
* *Sept. 17 to Nov. 19:* Sat., 10 am-1 pm
* *Berkeley:* Room 05, UC Berkeley Extension International Center,
2222 Harold Way
* *$400* */(EDP 021550)/*
Glenn Meyer
2005-08-21 05:45:33 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
I sent the following announcement under the wrong subject heading.
Instead of "Northern Cal. ARCE/UCB April 17 lecture: Working with the
Dead at El Hibeh, Egypt", the subject heading should have been
"Egyptology Course on 18th Dynasty to be offered through UC Berkeley
Extension.

Please accept my apologies for the error, and for the multiplicity of
postings.

Glenn
Post by Glenn Meyer
I would like to recommend the following Egyptology course, which is
offered through UC Berkeley Extension this Fall, on Saturdays, from 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. For more information, you can go to
www.unex.berkeley.edu on the web, or call Extension enrollment at
510-642-4111.
Glenn
From http://www.unex.berkeley.edu/cat/course906.html
NEW THIS TERM
The 18th Dynasty of Egypt
X156 (2 semester units in Near Eastern Studies)
Hatshepsut, King of Egypt,” de Young Museum, San Francisco/
Hatshepsut, the queen who took the titles of a king, and Tutankhamun,
the young man whose burial astonished the world of archaeology, are
among the best-known rulers of ancient Egypt. But the 18th Dynasty
also included the great warrior and builder Thutmose III, Amenhotep
the Magnificent, and Akhenaten, the “heretic.”
This course takes up the art, architecture, history, and literature of
the 18th Dynasty, attending to primary sources ranging from military
annals to the Book of the Dead, from building dedications to private
letters and autobiographies. Special attention is given to the
monuments of Thebes and relevant museum collections.
The course includes a field trip to the exhibition at the de Young Museum.
*INSTRUCTOR Terry Moore*
* *10 meetings*
* *Sept. 17 to Nov. 19:* Sat., 10 am-1 pm
* *Berkeley:* Room 05, UC Berkeley Extension International Center,
2222 Harold Way
* *$400* */(EDP 021550)/*
--
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Glenn Meyer ANE/Egyptology Enthusiast
Card-Carrying Member of the ACLU Computer Graphics SW Engineer
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Glenn Meyer
2005-08-29 07:31:14 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
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The Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt
in conjunction with the Rosicrucian Egyptian Museum, San Jose,
presents the lecture

The Birth of American Egyptology:
The Life of James Henry Breasted

by
Dr. Emily Teeter
Oriental Research Associate
University of Chicago

NOTE THE LOCATION!!!

Date: Sunday, September 18, 2005
Time: 2:30 p.m.
Place: Rosicrucian Egyptian Museum
San Jose (for directions, go to
http://www.egyptianmuseum.org/visit/index.html
or call 408-947-3600)
Admission: General Public: $15;
Friends of the Museum & ARCE members: $10;
Students: $5.00

Emily Teeter is a research associate and curator of
Egyptian and Nubian antiquities at the Oriental
Institute Museum, University of Chicago. She is the
author of a wide variety of books and scholarly
articles about Egyptian religion and history, and
has participated in expeditions in Giza, Luxor, and
Alexandria.



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American Research Center in Egypt
Northern California Chapter
P. O. Box 11352
Berkeley, CA 94712-2352

Website: http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed/lectures.htm

For more information please call 510-527-9746
or send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu
||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2005-09-18 05:36:45 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
<head>
<meta content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type">
<title></title>
</head>
<body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000">
<br>
<font color="#333333"><b>Hatshepsut: From Queen to Pharaoh<br>
</b>
&nbsp;<a href="http://www.thinker.org/fam/press/press.asp?presskey=201"
eudora="autourl">
http://www.thinker.org/fam/press/press.asp?presskey=201<br>
<br>
</a>Contact Information<br>
Barbara Traisman<br>
<a href="mailto:***@famsf.org">***@famsf.org</a><br>
415.750.3620<br>
<br>
7/27/2005<br>
<br>
Major Exhibition Debuts at Opening of New de Young<br>
<br>
<b>de Young<br>
15 October 2005-5 February 2006<br>
<br>
</b>San Francisco, 27 July 2005--<i>Hatshepsut: From Queen to Pharaoh</i>
opens in San Francisco as the major inaugural exhibition at the new de
Young museum and as the premiere showing of this landmark exhibition,
which will be on view in only two additional venues: The Metropolitan
Museum of Art, New York, and the Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth. The
fascinating display highlights the art that was created during the
glorious reign of the enigmatic and intriguing female pharaoh
Hatshepsut,
who shared Egypt&#8217;s throne for nearly two decades (ca. 1473-1458 BC) in
the early New Kingdom as senior co-ruler with her young nephew,
Tuthmosis
III.<br>
<br>
Hatshepsut&#8217;s reign was a period of immense artistic creativity. This
unprecedented exhibition brings together a vast treasure trove of
almost
300 objects that includes royal statuary and relief, monumental
sculpture
representing members of the royal court, a wide variety of ceremonial
objects, finely crafted decorative objects, dazzling gold jewelry, and
other exquisite personal items, all of which both tell the compelling
story of Hatshepsut&#8217;s reign and reveal the diverse and sophisticated
artistic production of her time. <br>
<br>
<b>Lenders to the Exhibition<br>
</b>The spectacular objects that have been lent for <i>Hatshepsut:
From
Queen to Pharaoh</i> were culled from an august body of international
institutions by the exhibition&#8217;s organizers, Dr. Ren&eacute;e Dreyfus, Fine
Arts
Museums of San Francisco Curator of Ancient Art and Interpretation and
Dr. Catharine H. Roehrig of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York,
in
consultation with Dr. Cathleen A. Keller of the University of
California,
Berkeley.<br>
<br>
The lending institutions include--in addition to The Metropolitan
Museum
of Art, which has lent approximately one-third of the works on
view--The
British Museum, The National Museums of Scotland, the Louvre, the
Museum
of Fine Arts, Boston, the Brooklyn Museum of Art, The University of
Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology &amp; Anthropology, the &Auml;gyptisches
Museum und Papyrussammlung Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, The Fitzwilliam
Museum, (Cambridge), the Kestner Museum (Hanover), the Field Museum
(Chicago), and the Museo Egizio, Torino. In addition, several signal
objects have been lent by the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. <br>
<br>
<b>Hatshepsut: Woman of Many Aspects<br>
</b>The phenomenon of a woman ruling a fundamentally patriarchal
society
while surrounded by male courtiers and advisors, the eventual
destruction
of Hatshepsut&#8217;s monuments by Tuthmosis III, and the omission of her
name
from later king lists have fueled debate among Egyptologists for over a
century. <i>Hatshepsut: From Queen to Pharaoh</i> presents the
changing
interpretations of the woman who, at about the age of 20, claimed the
full powers of the throne upon the death of her husband, Tuthmosis II,
who was also her half-brother, and gradually assumed the title of
&#8220;King&#8221;
and the trappings of kingship in addition to the queenly titles that
she
already held. <br>
<br>
Under an unusual line of succession, she and Tuthmosis III, who was the
son of Hatshepsut&#8217;s husband, but by a lesser queen, effectively shared
the throne of Egypt as two kings for a period of almost 20 years.
Hatshepsut&#8217;s metamorphosis from a queen into a king took place
gradually
and appears to have gone through a series of exploratory phases. Her
monuments depict her both as a woman and as a man, in king&#8217;s regalia,
including a strapped-on false beard. As Egypt&#8217;s two Horuses, Hatshepsut
and Tuthmosis III, 13 years her junior, frequently appeared together on
monuments as &#8220;twin&#8221; male rulers distinguished only by the position of
their cartouches--with Hatshepsut usually taking precedence--or
occasionally by their regalia. <br>
<br>
Although her reign defied long-established convention, it was accepted
by
her people and Egypt flourished, as seen through the superb and
innovative art and architecture of her prosperous and largely peaceful
rule. About 20 years after Hatshepsut&#8217;s death, however, her name and
her
image were systematically obliterated, her kingly monuments were
destroyed, and she was forgotten.<br>
<br>
<b>Highlights of the Exhibition<br>
</b>The exhibition is rich in standout objects ranging in scale from
monumental sculptures to delicate gold jewelry and finely detailed
scarabs, seals and figurines. Colossal sculptures in the main hall of
the
exhibition reveal the majesty of Hatshepsut as king. These include one
of
the six extant massive granite sphinxes depicting Hatshepsut as a lion,
a
colossal kneeling figure of Hatshepsut holding small offering jars, and
an enormous striding figure of her. There are also smaller stone
figures
of Hatshepsut as well as three large painted limestone reliefs from her
mortuary temple at Deir el-Bahri, which depict marching soldiers. In
addition, there are a number of stone figures of Senemut, one of the
most
eminent and influential officials of the Eighteenth Dynasty. Also of
particular interest is the granite <i>False-Door Stela</i> of
Tuthmosis
I, an object that was the ritual focus of his offering cult. A gallery
devoted to Tuthmosis III when he assumed sole reign after Hatshepsut&#8217;s
death displays sculpture that attests to the greatness he achieved
during
his long reign, such as a powerful, majestic nearly life-size standing
figure carved in greywacke. Among the many surviving statues of this
king, the one on view in the exhibition best conveys the impression of
a
personal likeness.<br>
<br>
Other stone objects of a smaller scale include varying sizes of
luminous,
alabaster vessels and unguent jars. Some of them are beautifully
inscribed, others have gold-rimmed bases and lids, and many of them
still
retain traces of their original contents. <br>
<br>
There are a number of remarkably well-preserved wooden decorative arts
and personal objects in the exhibition. Highlights of these pieces
include a royal wooden bed inlaid with cobras of sheet gold, a wood and
ivory--which was as highly prized as gold--chair, and small wooden
boxes
and a gaming board of wood and ivory, as well as a wood and silver
staff.
Among the leather objects are a painting of a woman playing a harp
while
a man enthusiastically dances, <br>
<br>
A wide array of personal items reflects the taste, luxury, and
craftsmanship of the times, such as a pair sandals made of gold, whose
design is startlingly contemporary. There is an abundance of dazzling
gold, silver, lapis, carnelian, cloisonn&eacute;, and faience and
semi-precious
stone jewelry in the exhibition. A particularly magnificent necklace,
the
<i>Horus Collar,</i> is a hammered sheet of gold decorated with a
falcon-headed clasp. A glimpse of daily life as led by royalty in the
Eighteenth Dynasty is provided by intimate items such as cosmetic boxes
and spoons, bronze mirrors, tweezers and a razor, a wood, ivory, and
copper kohl tube, wooden hairpins, and gold finger and toe stalls,
which
were used for funerary trappings.<br>
<br>
Finally, other objects bespeak of everyday life of the Eighteenth
Dynasty. These include such items as colorful faience bowls, delightful
figure vases, ceremonial weapons, and model tools that were placed as
foundation deposits at Deir el-Bahri. <br>
<br>
<b>Organization and Credit<br>
</b>The exhibition has been organized by the Fine Arts Museums of San
Francisco and The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. The exhibition
is
supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and
Humanities, and by a generous grant from the National Endowment for the
Arts, a Federal agency.<br>
<br>
<b>Catalogue<br>
</b>The exhibition will be accompanied by a fully illustrated
catalogue,
published by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, with worldwide
distribution
through Yale University Press. Co-editors Dr. Ren&eacute;e Dreyfus, Fine Arts
Museums of San Francisco, Dr. Cathleen Keller, University of
California,
Berkeley, and Dr. Catharine Roehrig, The Metropolitan Museum of Art,
will
also provide substantial contributions to the publication, along with a
number of other top scholars in the field. 600 pages, 450 color
illustrations and 100 black and white illustrations and images;
hardcover
$75, paperback, $50 <br>
<br>
<b>Venues<br>
</b>de Young, San Francisco, 15 October 2005-5 February 2006<br>
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 21 March-9 July 2006<br>
Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, 27 August-10 December 2006<br>
<br>
<b>Audio Tour for Adults and for Children<br>
</b><i>Hatshepsut: From Queen to Pharaoh</i> is accompanied by an
Antenna
Audio tour for both adults and children that explores the fascinating
stories behind many of the objects on view. The audio tour includes
commentary by exhibition co-curators Dr. Ren&eacute;e Dreyfus, Fine Arts
Museums&#8217; Curator of Ancient Art and Interpretation, Dr. Catharine H.
Roehrig of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, as well as Professor
Cathleen
A. Keller of the University of California, Berkeley. It traces
Hatshepsut&#8217;s emergence as co-regent of Egypt and continues with
insights
into her rule, her predecessors, and the continuing mystery of her
exclusion from subsequent king lists in ancient Egypt. The tour
explores
the context and artistry of monumental statues of Hatshepsut and
others,
as well as many delicate, rare, and highly refined objects of daily and
ceremonial use, such as jewelry, toiletries, and furnishings, which
help
bring the era to life. A musical score interwoven into the audio tour
evokes the time and place, helping to provide visitors with an
immersive
experience.<br>
<br>
<b>Admission Fees and Ticket Information<br>
</b>There is a $5 surcharge for <i>Hatshepsut: From Queen to Pharaoh.</i>
Prices are $15 adults; $12 seniors; $11 youths ages 13-17; and children
ages 12 and under are free. Timed and dated tickets may be purchased in
advance. Complete ticketing information will be available on the Fine
Arts Museums website:
<a href="http://www.thinker.org/" eudora="autourl">www.thinker.org<br>
<br>
</a><b>About the new de Young<br>
</b>Founded in 1895 in San Francisco&#8217;s Golden Gate Park, the de Young
museum has been an integral part of the cultural fabric of the city and
a
cherished destination for millions of residents and visitors to the
region for over 100 years. On <b>October 15, 2005,</b> the de Young
museum will re-open in a new facility designed by the Swiss
architecture
firm Herzog &amp; de Meuron and Fong &amp; Chan Architects in San
Francisco. The new de Young will provide San Francisco with a landmark
art museum to showcase the museum&#8217;s significant collections of American
art from the 17th through the 20th centuries, modern and contemporary
art, art from Central and South America, the Pacific and Africa, as
well
as an important and diverse collection of textiles. <br>
<br>
The de Young and its sister museum, the Legion of Honor, together make
up
the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, the largest public arts
institution in the city and one of the largest art museums in the
United
States.<br>
<br>
Museum Hours: Tuesday &#8211; Sunday: 9:30 a.m.-5:15 p.m.; Friday: Open until
8:45 p.m. Admission Fees: Adults $10, Seniors $7, Youth 13-17 and
college
students with ID $6 Children 12 and under FREE; First Tuesday of Each
Month FREE; Muni visitor discount (with fast pass or transfer) $2
DISCOUNT<br>
</font><br>
<br>
</body>
</html>
Eric Stevens
2005-09-18 09:12:44 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Glenn Meyer
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
<head>
<meta content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type">
<title></title>
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<body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000">
<br>
<font color="#333333"><b>Hatshepsut: From Queen to Pharaoh<br>
</b>
&nbsp;<a href="http://www.thinker.org/fam/press/press.asp?presskey=201"
eudora="autourl">
http://www.thinker.org/fam/press/press.asp?presskey=201<br>
<br>
</a>Contact Information<br>
Barbara Traisman<br>
415.750.3620<br>
<br>
7/27/2005<br>
<br>
Major Exhibition Debuts at Opening of New de Young<br>
<br>
<b>de Young<br>
15 October 2005-5 February 2006<br>
<br>
</b>San Francisco, 27 July 2005--<i>Hatshepsut: From Queen to Pharaoh</i>
opens in San Francisco as the major inaugural exhibition at the new de
Young museum and as the premiere showing of this landmark exhibition,
which will be on view in only two additional venues: The Metropolitan
Museum of Art, New York, and the Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth. The
fascinating display highlights the art that was created during the
glorious reign of the enigmatic and intriguing female pharaoh
Hatshepsut,
who shared Egypt&#8217;s throne for nearly two decades (ca. 1473-1458 BC) in
the early New Kingdom as senior co-ruler with her young nephew,
Tuthmosis
III.<br>
<br>
Hatshepsut&#8217;s reign was a period of immense artistic creativity. This
unprecedented exhibition brings together a vast treasure trove of
almost
300 objects that includes royal statuary and relief, monumental
sculpture
representing members of the royal court, a wide variety of ceremonial
objects, finely crafted decorative objects, dazzling gold jewelry, and
other exquisite personal items, all of which both tell the compelling
story of Hatshepsut&#8217;s reign and reveal the diverse and sophisticated
artistic production of her time. <br>
<br>
<b>Lenders to the Exhibition<br>
From
Queen to Pharaoh</i> were culled from an august body of international
institutions by the exhibition&#8217;s organizers, Dr. Ren&eacute;e Dreyfus, Fine
Arts
Museums of San Francisco Curator of Ancient Art and Interpretation and
Dr. Catharine H. Roehrig of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York,
in
consultation with Dr. Cathleen A. Keller of the University of
California,
Berkeley.<br>
<br>
The lending institutions include--in addition to The Metropolitan
Museum
of Art, which has lent approximately one-third of the works on
view--The
British Museum, The National Museums of Scotland, the Louvre, the
Museum
of Fine Arts, Boston, the Brooklyn Museum of Art, The University of
Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology &amp; Anthropology, the &Auml;gyptisches
Museum und Papyrussammlung Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, The Fitzwilliam
Museum, (Cambridge), the Kestner Museum (Hanover), the Field Museum
(Chicago), and the Museo Egizio, Torino. In addition, several signal
objects have been lent by the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. <br>
<br>
<b>Hatshepsut: Woman of Many Aspects<br>
</b>The phenomenon of a woman ruling a fundamentally patriarchal
society
while surrounded by male courtiers and advisors, the eventual
destruction
of Hatshepsut&#8217;s monuments by Tuthmosis III, and the omission of her
name
from later king lists have fueled debate among Egyptologists for over a
century. <i>Hatshepsut: From Queen to Pharaoh</i> presents the
changing
interpretations of the woman who, at about the age of 20, claimed the
full powers of the throne upon the death of her husband, Tuthmosis II,
who was also her half-brother, and gradually assumed the title of
&#8220;King&#8221;
and the trappings of kingship in addition to the queenly titles that
she
already held. <br>
<br>
Under an unusual line of succession, she and Tuthmosis III, who was the
son of Hatshepsut&#8217;s husband, but by a lesser queen, effectively shared
the throne of Egypt as two kings for a period of almost 20 years.
Hatshepsut&#8217;s metamorphosis from a queen into a king took place
gradually
and appears to have gone through a series of exploratory phases. Her
monuments depict her both as a woman and as a man, in king&#8217;s regalia,
including a strapped-on false beard. As Egypt&#8217;s two Horuses, Hatshepsut
and Tuthmosis III, 13 years her junior, frequently appeared together on
monuments as &#8220;twin&#8221; male rulers distinguished only by the position of
their cartouches--with Hatshepsut usually taking precedence--or
occasionally by their regalia. <br>
<br>
Although her reign defied long-established convention, it was accepted
by
her people and Egypt flourished, as seen through the superb and
innovative art and architecture of her prosperous and largely peaceful
rule. About 20 years after Hatshepsut&#8217;s death, however, her name and
her
image were systematically obliterated, her kingly monuments were
destroyed, and she was forgotten.<br>
<br>
<b>Highlights of the Exhibition<br>
</b>The exhibition is rich in standout objects ranging in scale from
monumental sculptures to delicate gold jewelry and finely detailed
scarabs, seals and figurines. Colossal sculptures in the main hall of
the
exhibition reveal the majesty of Hatshepsut as king. These include one
of
the six extant massive granite sphinxes depicting Hatshepsut as a lion,
a
colossal kneeling figure of Hatshepsut holding small offering jars, and
an enormous striding figure of her. There are also smaller stone
figures
of Hatshepsut as well as three large painted limestone reliefs from her
mortuary temple at Deir el-Bahri, which depict marching soldiers. In
addition, there are a number of stone figures of Senemut, one of the
most
eminent and influential officials of the Eighteenth Dynasty. Also of
particular interest is the granite <i>False-Door Stela</i> of
Tuthmosis
I, an object that was the ritual focus of his offering cult. A gallery
devoted to Tuthmosis III when he assumed sole reign after Hatshepsut&#8217;s
death displays sculpture that attests to the greatness he achieved
during
his long reign, such as a powerful, majestic nearly life-size standing
figure carved in greywacke. Among the many surviving statues of this
king, the one on view in the exhibition best conveys the impression of
a
personal likeness.<br>
<br>
Other stone objects of a smaller scale include varying sizes of
luminous,
alabaster vessels and unguent jars. Some of them are beautifully
inscribed, others have gold-rimmed bases and lids, and many of them
still
retain traces of their original contents. <br>
<br>
There are a number of remarkably well-preserved wooden decorative arts
and personal objects in the exhibition. Highlights of these pieces
include a royal wooden bed inlaid with cobras of sheet gold, a wood and
ivory--which was as highly prized as gold--chair, and small wooden
boxes
and a gaming board of wood and ivory, as well as a wood and silver
staff.
Among the leather objects are a painting of a woman playing a harp
while
a man enthusiastically dances, <br>
<br>
A wide array of personal items reflects the taste, luxury, and
craftsmanship of the times, such as a pair sandals made of gold, whose
design is startlingly contemporary. There is an abundance of dazzling
gold, silver, lapis, carnelian, cloisonn&eacute;, and faience and
semi-precious
stone jewelry in the exhibition. A particularly magnificent necklace,
the
<i>Horus Collar,</i> is a hammered sheet of gold decorated with a
falcon-headed clasp. A glimpse of daily life as led by royalty in the
Eighteenth Dynasty is provided by intimate items such as cosmetic boxes
and spoons, bronze mirrors, tweezers and a razor, a wood, ivory, and
copper kohl tube, wooden hairpins, and gold finger and toe stalls,
which
were used for funerary trappings.<br>
<br>
Finally, other objects bespeak of everyday life of the Eighteenth
Dynasty. These include such items as colorful faience bowls, delightful
figure vases, ceremonial weapons, and model tools that were placed as
foundation deposits at Deir el-Bahri. <br>
<br>
<b>Organization and Credit<br>
</b>The exhibition has been organized by the Fine Arts Museums of San
Francisco and The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. The exhibition
is
supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and
Humanities, and by a generous grant from the National Endowment for the
Arts, a Federal agency.<br>
<br>
<b>Catalogue<br>
</b>The exhibition will be accompanied by a fully illustrated
catalogue,
published by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, with worldwide
distribution
through Yale University Press. Co-editors Dr. Ren&eacute;e Dreyfus, Fine Arts
Museums of San Francisco, Dr. Cathleen Keller, University of
California,
Berkeley, and Dr. Catharine Roehrig, The Metropolitan Museum of Art,
will
also provide substantial contributions to the publication, along with a
number of other top scholars in the field. 600 pages, 450 color
illustrations and 100 black and white illustrations and images;
hardcover
$75, paperback, $50 <br>
<br>
<b>Venues<br>
</b>de Young, San Francisco, 15 October 2005-5 February 2006<br>
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 21 March-9 July 2006<br>
Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, 27 August-10 December 2006<br>
<br>
<b>Audio Tour for Adults and for Children<br>
</b><i>Hatshepsut: From Queen to Pharaoh</i> is accompanied by an
Antenna
Audio tour for both adults and children that explores the fascinating
stories behind many of the objects on view. The audio tour includes
commentary by exhibition co-curators Dr. Ren&eacute;e Dreyfus, Fine Arts
Museums&#8217; Curator of Ancient Art and Interpretation, Dr. Catharine H.
Roehrig of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, as well as Professor
Cathleen
A. Keller of the University of California, Berkeley. It traces
Hatshepsut&#8217;s emergence as co-regent of Egypt and continues with
insights
into her rule, her predecessors, and the continuing mystery of her
exclusion from subsequent king lists in ancient Egypt. The tour
explores
the context and artistry of monumental statues of Hatshepsut and
others,
as well as many delicate, rare, and highly refined objects of daily and
ceremonial use, such as jewelry, toiletries, and furnishings, which
help
bring the era to life. A musical score interwoven into the audio tour
evokes the time and place, helping to provide visitors with an
immersive
experience.<br>
<br>
<b>Admission Fees and Ticket Information<br>
</b>There is a $5 surcharge for <i>Hatshepsut: From Queen to Pharaoh.</i>
Prices are $15 adults; $12 seniors; $11 youths ages 13-17; and children
ages 12 and under are free. Timed and dated tickets may be purchased in
advance. Complete ticketing information will be available on the Fine
<a href="http://www.thinker.org/" eudora="autourl">www.thinker.org<br>
<br>
</a><b>About the new de Young<br>
</b>Founded in 1895 in San Francisco&#8217;s Golden Gate Park, the de Young
museum has been an integral part of the cultural fabric of the city and
a
cherished destination for millions of residents and visitors to the
region for over 100 years. On <b>October 15, 2005,</b> the de Young
museum will re-open in a new facility designed by the Swiss
architecture
firm Herzog &amp; de Meuron and Fong &amp; Chan Architects in San
Francisco. The new de Young will provide San Francisco with a landmark
art museum to showcase the museum&#8217;s significant collections of American
art from the 17th through the 20th centuries, modern and contemporary
art, art from Central and South America, the Pacific and Africa, as
well
as an important and diverse collection of textiles. <br>
<br>
The de Young and its sister museum, the Legion of Honor, together make
up
the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, the largest public arts
institution in the city and one of the largest art museums in the
United
States.<br>
<br>
Museum Hours: Tuesday &#8211; Sunday: 9:30 a.m.-5:15 p.m.; Friday: Open until
8:45 p.m. Admission Fees: Adults $10, Seniors $7, Youth 13-17 and
college
students with ID $6 Children 12 and under FREE; First Tuesday of Each
Month FREE; Muni visitor discount (with fast pass or transfer) $2
DISCOUNT<br>
</font><br>
<br>
</body>
</html>
I can only read this if I want to reply but, having read it, I don't
want to reply. :-)



Eric Stevens
JTEM
2005-09-19 05:54:31 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Glenn Meyer
Hatshepsut: From Queen to Pharaoh
http://www.thinker.org/fam/press/press.asp?presskey=201
Yes. Damn them! Damn them all!

The ONE object I could recommend in Boston's MFA collection
is included in this show -- A sarcophagus originally carved for
Hatshepsut & later re-carved for her father. To further add to it's
historical pedigree, the sarcophagus was originally recovered
by none other than Howard Carter, the man who would later
discover Tutankhamun's tomb!
Glenn Meyer
2005-10-06 06:09:13 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Glenn Meyer
2005-10-09 07:40:20 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
-------- Original Message --------
Subject: AESA in Seattle and in Portland
Date: Fri, 7 Oct 2005 09:28:38 -0700
From: Liisa Prehn <***@comcast.net>
To: ***@glennmeyer.net


Glenn, here are 2 lectures: *in Seattle:*

Denise Doxey:"George, She's a dud"; Highlights and lowligthts of the
Harvard University - Museum of Fine Arts Expedition to Egypt.
Saturday, Oct. 22, 2005, at 2.00 pm, at Seattle Art Museum, Downtown.
Tickets $5 for AESA and SAM members, $8 for others.
Contact: Liisa Prehn, ***@comcast.net <mailto:***@comcast.net>,
206.722.9171


*in Portland OR.*:

W.Benson Harer, M.D.: "Mummies and Medicine".
Tuesday Oct. 25,2005 at 7:30 pm. Portland State University Smith
Memeorial Student Union Multicultural Center, Rm. 228

Contact: Connie Terwilliger, ***@teleport.com
<mailto:***@teleport.com>, 503.644.1933
Glenn Meyer
2005-10-10 07:00:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Please note that I have converted the pdf format mentioned by Scott to text, for
ease in posting, since some groups will not accept binary attachments.


Glenn


-------- Original Message --------

Subject:

Egypt travel: attached

Date:

Sat, 8 Oct 2005 09:20:09 -0700 (PDT)

From:

Scott Noegel <***@u.washington.edu>

To:

scott noegel <***@u.washington.edu>


Dear ancient Egypt enthusiasts,

The American Research Center in Egypt (Northwest Chapter) and
Ceravan-Serai Tours will be sponsoring a tour to Egypt this coming
December. If you would like to join us for some sun and nice weather and
escape the dark and rain of the Pacific Northwest, have a look at the
attached flyer (pdf format). :)

Best,

Scott Noegel

President ARCE/NW
Dept. Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations
University of Washington
Box 353120
Seattle, WA 98195

Office: 206-543-3606
Dept: 206-543-6033
FAX: 206-685-7936
http://faculty.washington.edu/snoegel/





Eternal Egypt - an in depth tour with Dr Scott Noegel, an associate
professor of Ancient Near Eastern Languages and Civilization at the
University of Washington

Click on the attachment to see the full itinerary- Dec 11-23 2005
Rita Zawaideh
Caravan-Serai,Inc.,
3806 Whitman Ave N
Seattle,Wa.,98103
(206)545-7300
(206)547-8607-Fax
1-800-451-8097
Bookmark this......
Everything you need to know about travel in the MIddle East
http://www.caravan-serai.com <http://www.caravan-serai.com/>
Glenn Meyer
2005-10-17 17:56:39 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
For immediate release please:

The American Research Center in Egypt's Northwest Chapter (ARCE/NW) is pleased
to announce the following presentation.

Kara Cooney, Stanford University
Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs

Monday, October 24, 2005, 6:30 PM

Seattle Public Library, Downtown Branch (Microsoft Auditorium)
between 4th and 5th Avenues, Madison and Spring Streets,
Downtown. Parking entrance is on Spring Street.

Admission: FREE

About the presentation:
Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs, at the Los Angeles County
Museum of Art until November 15th, is the first exhibition to place the
materials found by Howard Carter in 1922 in their historical, religious, and
sociopolitical context. Unlike previous exhibitions of this 'boy-king,' the
material will not be viewed in aesthetic isolation, but will provide the
viewer with a broad contextual understanding of massive political and
religious changes occurring in Egypt in the late 18th Dynasty (late 14th
century BCE). When confronted with such a huge amount of high quality, high
cost burial goods, one of the first questions a viewer may ask is: why was
there such intense and systematic preparation for the burial of the Egyptian
king and elite? To clarify these questions further: does this mass of material
embody socio-political concerns, i.e. as conspicuous consumption? Or might the
intense preparation mirror deep psychological preparation for one's inevitable
death? This lecture will address how Egyptian materialism encapsulates
spirituality.

About the speaker:
Dr. Kathlyn Cooney is co-curator at LACMA for Tutankhamun and the Golden Age
of the Pharaohs. She has taught at Howard, UCLA, and she presently holds a
Humanities fellowship at Stanford University where she teaches in the
Introduction to the Humanities Program. She was involved with the installation
of the Cairo Museum exhibition Quest for Immortality: Treasures of Ancient
Egypt at the National Gallery of Art in 2002. Her field experience includes
three season's excavation in a non-royal tomb in Luxor and one season at the
royal pyramid site of Lisht. She is now revising her dissertation The Value of
Ramesside Funerary Art for publication in 2006 and working on a number of
articles related to her many research interests, including the gender issues
of death in ancient Egypt, craft specialization, funerary arts in the ancient
world, and ancient Egyptian ritual studies. She received her doctorate in
Egyptology at Johns Hopkins University in 2003.

Co-sponsors:
Co-sponsored with the Seattle Public Library, Department of Near Eastern
Languages and Civilization (UW), and the Burke Museum of Natural History and
Culture.

For more information visit:
<http://home.earthlink.net/~arcenwor/ARCE_Northwest_Chapter.html>


Best,

Scott Noegel, President ARCE/NW

Dept. Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations
University of Washington
Box 353120
Seattle, WA 98195

Office: 206-543-3606
Dept: 206-543-6033
FAX: 206-685-7936
http://faculty.washington.edu/snoegel/
Glenn Meyer
2005-10-21 07:06:48 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
<head>
<meta content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type">
<title></title>
</head>
<body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000">
<div class="Section1">
<p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align: center;" align="center"><font
size="+2"><i style=""><span
style="font-size: 48pt; font-family: Algerian;">MARIE BUTTERY
MEMORIAL PRIZE AND LECTURE<o:p></o:p></span></i></font></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><font size="+2"><span style="font-size: 16pt;"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></font></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 16pt;">Marie Buttery,
founder and
first president of the Northern California Chapter of the </span><st1:place><st1:placename><span
style="font-size: 16pt;">American</span></st1:placename><span
style="font-size: 16pt;"> </span><st1:placename><span
style="font-size: 16pt;">Research</span></st1:placename><span
style="font-size: 16pt;"> </span><st1:placetype><span
style="font-size: 16pt;">Center</span></st1:placetype></st1:place><span
style="font-size: 16pt;"> in Egypt (ARCE), loved every aspect of
Ancient Egypt
and was a strong supporter of ARCE for many years. <span style="">&nbsp;</span>The
Northern California ARCE Chapter is proud
to honor Marie by offering the annual MARIE BUTTERY MEMORIAL PRIZE AND
LECTURE
in her memory and in memory of her great love for Egyptology.<span
style="">&nbsp; </span>The award endows a student lecture in
Egyptology that is offered annually by the Northern California Chapter
of the </span><st1:placename><span style="font-size: 16pt;">American</span></st1:placename><span
style="font-size: 16pt;"> </span><st1:placename><span
style="font-size: 16pt;">Research</span></st1:placename><span
style="font-size: 16pt;"> </span><st1:placetype><span
style="font-size: 16pt;">Center</span></st1:placetype><span
style="font-size: 16pt;"> in </span><st1:country-region><st1:place><span
style="font-size: 16pt;">Egypt</span></st1:place></st1:country-region><span
style="font-size: 16pt;">.<o:p></o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align: center;" align="center"><span
style="font-size: 16pt;"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><b style=""><span style="font-size: 14pt;">ELIGIBILITY</span></b><span
style="font-size: 14pt;">:<span style="">&nbsp; </span>Any </span><st1:place><st1:state><span
style="font-size: 14pt;">California</span></st1:state></st1:place><span
style="font-size: 14pt;"> undergraduate or graduate student<o:p></o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><b style=""><span style="font-size: 14pt;">VALUE
OF THE PRIZE</span></b><span style="font-size: 14pt;">:<span style="">&nbsp;
</span>$500.00, to be presented
following the Lecture<o:p></o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><b style=""><span style="font-size: 14pt;">TOPIC</span></b><span
style="font-size: 14pt;">:<span style="">&nbsp; </span>Any aspect of
Ancient Egypt, defined as
predynastic through Greco-Roman<o:p></o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><b style=""><span style="font-size: 14pt;">PAPER</span></b><span
style="font-size: 14pt;">:<span style="">&nbsp; </span>Applicants should
submit, in electronic
format (HTML, PDF or Word preferred), a paper suitable for an
illustrated
lecture presentation of approximately 1 hour.<span style="">&nbsp;
</span><b style="">Deadline for Submission is 15
NOVEMBER 2005</b>.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>Applicants will be
notified of status by not later than 1 DECEMBER 2005.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>Papers
will be evaluated on: originality,
scholarly caliber, and ability to make the topic come alive to the
general
public.<o:p></o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><b style=""><span style="font-size: 14pt;">DATE
LECTURE IS TO BE DELIVERED</span></b><span style="font-size: 14pt;">:
11 DECEMBER 2005, at UC Berkeley<o:p></o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><b style=""><span style="font-size: 14pt;">SUBMIT
PAPER ELECTRONICALLY TO</span></b><span style="font-size: 14pt;">:<span
style="">&nbsp; </span><span style="">&nbsp; </span><a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:***@glennmeyer.net">***@glennmeyer.net</a></span><span
style="font-size: 16pt;"><o:p></o:p></span></p>
</div>
</body>
</html>
Glenn Meyer
2005-10-28 08:36:31 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Glenn Meyer
2005-11-11 07:56:24 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
<head>
<meta content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type">
<title></title>
</head>
<body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000">
<p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align: center;" align="center"><font
size="+2"><i style=""><span
style="font-size: 48pt; font-family: Algerian;">MARIE BUTTERY
MEMORIAL PRIZE AND LECTURE<o:p></o:p></span></i></font></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><font size="+2"><span style="font-size: 16pt;"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></font></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 16pt;">Marie Buttery,
founder and
first president of the Northern California Chapter of the </span><st1:place><st1:placename><span
style="font-size: 16pt;">American</span></st1:placename><span
style="font-size: 16pt;"> </span><st1:placename><span
style="font-size: 16pt;">Research</span></st1:placename><span
style="font-size: 16pt;"> </span><st1:placetype><span
style="font-size: 16pt;">Center</span></st1:placetype></st1:place><span
style="font-size: 16pt;"> in Egypt (ARCE), loved every aspect of
Ancient Egypt
and was a strong supporter of ARCE for many years. <span style="">&nbsp;</span>The
Northern California ARCE Chapter is proud
to honor Marie by offering the annual MARIE BUTTERY MEMORIAL PRIZE AND
LECTURE
in her memory and in memory of her great love for Egyptology.<span
style="">&nbsp; </span>The award endows a student lecture in
Egyptology that is offered annually by the Northern California Chapter
of the </span><st1:placename><span style="font-size: 16pt;">American</span></st1:placename><span
style="font-size: 16pt;"> </span><st1:placename><span
style="font-size: 16pt;">Research</span></st1:placename><span
style="font-size: 16pt;"> </span><st1:placetype><span
style="font-size: 16pt;">Center</span></st1:placetype><span
style="font-size: 16pt;"> in </span><st1:country-region><st1:place><span
style="font-size: 16pt;">Egypt</span></st1:place></st1:country-region><span
style="font-size: 16pt;">.<o:p></o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align: center;" align="center"><span
style="font-size: 16pt;"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><b style=""><span style="font-size: 14pt;">ELIGIBILITY</span></b><span
style="font-size: 14pt;">:<span style="">&nbsp; </span>Any </span><st1:place><st1:state><span
style="font-size: 14pt;">California</span></st1:state></st1:place><span
style="font-size: 14pt;"> undergraduate or graduate student<o:p></o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><b style=""><span style="font-size: 14pt;">VALUE
OF THE PRIZE</span></b><span style="font-size: 14pt;">:<span style="">&nbsp;
</span>$500.00, to be presented
following the Lecture<o:p></o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><b style=""><span style="font-size: 14pt;">TOPIC</span></b><span
style="font-size: 14pt;">:<span style="">&nbsp; </span>Any aspect of
Ancient Egypt, defined as
predynastic through Greco-Roman<o:p></o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><b style=""><span style="font-size: 14pt;">PAPER</span></b><span
style="font-size: 14pt;">:<span style="">&nbsp; </span>Applicants should
submit, in electronic
format (HTML, PDF or Word preferred), a paper suitable for an
illustrated
lecture presentation of approximately 1 hour.<span style="">&nbsp;
</span><u><big><b><font color="#ff0000">Deadline for Submission is 15
NOVEMBER 2005.<span style="">&nbsp; </span></font></b></big></u>Applicants
will be
notified of status by not later than 1 DECEMBER 2005.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>Papers
will be evaluated on: originality,
scholarly caliber, and ability to make the topic come alive to the
general
public.<o:p></o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><b style=""><span style="font-size: 14pt;">DATE
LECTURE IS TO BE DELIVERED</span></b><span style="font-size: 14pt;">:
11 DECEMBER 2005, at UC Berkeley<o:p></o:p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p>
<b style=""><span style="font-size: 14pt;">SUBMIT
PAPER ELECTRONICALLY TO</span></b><span style="font-size: 14pt;">:<span
style="">&nbsp; </span><span style="">&nbsp; </span><a
class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:***@glennmeyer.net">***@glennmeyer.net</a></span>
</body>
</html>
Glenn Meyer
2005-12-01 06:19:21 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Glenn Meyer
2006-01-12 02:10:22 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
|||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
The Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt,
the Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley
and the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley
present the lecture

The Might of Tutankhamun:
Warfare During the Amarna Period


by Dr. Colleen Manassa, Yale University


Date: January 22nd, 2006
Time: Lecture at 2:30PM
Location: 20 Barrows Hall, U.C. Berkeley Campus

Parking is available in U.C. lots after 5
p.m. on weekdays and all day on weekends for
a $7.00 fee. Ticket dispensing machines
accept either $5 bills or $1.00 bills. The
Underhill lot can be entered from Channing
way off College Avenue. Other lots are
located along Bancroft. Parking is also
available on the circle drive in front of the
Valley Life Sciences Building which can be
entered from Oxford Street. A map of the
campus is available online at

http://www.berkeley.edu/campus_map/

For more information please call 510-527-9746
or send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu

The American Research Center in Egypt
Northern California Chapter
439 Buena Vista Avenue
Redwood City, CA 94061-4207


http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed/

Copyright 2005 The Board of Directors, The American
Research Center in Egypt, Northern California
Chapter. All rights reserved.

|||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||

UPCOMING EVENTS

All lectures are on Sunday at
2:30 p.m. in 20 Barrows Hall,
U.C. Berkeley Campus, except where noted.

--

February 19, 2006 2:30 PM

Dr. Terry Moore, U.C. Berkeley
Monastic Life in Egypt
1000BC to 400 AD

Room 238 Barrows Hall
U.C. Berkeley Campus

--

March 5, 2006 2:30 PM

Dr. Josef Wegner, U.C. Berkeley

Recent Excavations at Abydos

Room 20 Barrows Hall
U.C. Berkeley Campus

--

Contact Joan Knudsen by email at
***@berkeley.edu for further
information on ARCE/NC events or
by mail at

P.O. Box 11352,
Berkeley, CA 94712-2352.

|||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
***@glennmeyer.net
|||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
Glenn Meyer
2006-01-12 02:29:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Ancient Hellenic Arts Council
Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco
Ancient Art Department
California Palace of the Legion of Honor

HATSHEPSUT: From QUEEN to PHARAOH

To bid a fond farewell to King Hatshepsut

The Ancient Art Department presents

Dr. Zahi Hawass

ONE DAY ONLY: Friday, 27 January 2006, 7:30 PM

Koret Auditorium
de Young Museum
Golden Gate Park

Dr. ZAHI HAWASS, Secretary-General of the Supreme Council
of Antiquities of Egypt, well-known Egyptologist, and
internationally renowned TV personality and author, will
speak about the CT scans of the mummies of King Tut and
Hatshepsut, his discoveries at the Valley of the Golden
Mummies and inside the Great Pyramid of Khufu, as well as
his other recent archaeological findings.

$25 per person

For reservations, please send checks payable to COFAM to:

Ancient Art Department
de Young Museum
50 Hagiwara Tea Garden Drive
Golden Gate Park
San Francisco, CA 94118

A confirmation will be sent after receipt of check.
Tickets may also be purchased at the auditorium on the
evening of the event on a space-available basis.

For information, please call 415 750 3686.


Lecture co-sponsored by the Fine Arts Museums of San
Francisco and the Consulate General of The Arab Republic
of Egypt in San Francisco.

Ancient Hellenic Arts Council supports Ancient Art at the FAMSF

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
***@glennmeyer.net
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Glenn Meyer
2006-02-13 08:08:40 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
The Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt
and the Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley and the Center
for Middle Eastern Studies, U.C. Berkeley present the lecture



*Monastic Life in Egypt*



*

Dr. Terry Moore

/

University of California, Berkeley

/*



*

Date: Sunday, February 19th, 2006

Time: 2:30 p.m.

Place: 238 Barrows Hall

U. C. Berkeley Campus

------------------------------------------------------------------------



*

Parking is available in U.C. lots after 5 p.m. on weekdays and all day
on weekends for a fee. Ticket dispensing machines accept either $5 bills
or $1.00 bills. The Underhill lot can be entered from Channing way off
College Avenue. Other lots are located along Bancroft. Parking is also
available on the circle drive in front of the Valley Life Sciences
Building which can be entered from Oxford Street. A map of the campus is
available online at

http://www.berkeley.edu/campus_map/

For more information please call 510-527-9746 or send e-mail to
***@uclink4.berkeley.edu <mailto:***@uclink4.berkeley.edu>

------------------------------------------------------------------------



*UPCOMING EVENTS*

All lectures are on Sunday at 2:30 p.m. in Room 20 Barrows Hall on the
U.C. Berkeley Campus unless otherwise noted.

*



March 5th, 2006 2:30 PM

Dr. Josef Wegner, University of Pennsylvania

Secrets of Senwosret III: The 2005 Season at Abydos

20 Barrows Hall, U.C. Berkeley Campus

------------------------------------------------------------------------



April 23rd, 2006 2:30 PM

Dr. Aidan Dodson, University of Bristol

The Rise and Fall of the House of Shoshenq

20 Barrows Hall, U.C. Berkeley Campus

------------------------------------------------------------------------



*

Contact Joan Knudsen by email at ***@berkeley.edu for further
information on ARCE/NC events or by mail at P.O. Box 11352, Berkeley, CA
94712-2352.
Glenn Meyer
2006-02-13 08:20:57 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
The Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt
and the Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley and the Center
for Middle Eastern Studies, U.C. Berkeley present the lecture



*Monastic Life in Egypt*



*

Dr. Terry Moore

/

University of California, Berkeley

/*



*

Date: Sunday, February 19th, 2006

Time: 2:30 p.m.

Place: 238 Barrows Hall

U. C. Berkeley Campus

------------------------------------------------------------------------



*

Parking is available in U.C. lots after 5 p.m. on weekdays and all day
on weekends for a fee. Ticket dispensing machines accept either $5 bills
or $1.00 bills. The Underhill lot can be entered from Channing way off
College Avenue. Other lots are located along Bancroft. Parking is also
available on the circle drive in front of the Valley Life Sciences
Building which can be entered from Oxford Street. A map of the campus is
available online at

http://www.berkeley.edu/campus_map/

For more information please call 510-527-9746 or send e-mail to
***@uclink4.berkeley.edu <mailto:***@uclink4.berkeley.edu>

------------------------------------------------------------------------



*UPCOMING EVENTS*

All lectures are on Sunday at 2:30 p.m. in Room 20 Barrows Hall on the
U.C. Berkeley Campus unless otherwise noted.

*



March 5th, 2006 2:30 PM

Dr. Josef Wegner, University of Pennsylvania

Secrets of Senwosret III: The 2005 Season at Abydos

20 Barrows Hall, U.C. Berkeley Campus

------------------------------------------------------------------------



April 23rd, 2006 2:30 PM

Dr. Aidan Dodson, University of Bristol

The Rise and Fall of the House of Shoshenq

20 Barrows Hall, U.C. Berkeley Campus

------------------------------------------------------------------------



*

Contact Joan Knudsen by email at ***@berkeley.edu for further
information on ARCE/NC events or by mail at P.O. Box 11352, Berkeley, CA
94712-2352.
Glenn Meyer
2006-02-13 08:51:02 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
This time it's a room change. Abject apologies to all of you who have
had to read this message more than once.

Glenn

--------------------

The Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt
and the Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley and the Center
for Middle Eastern Studies, U.C. Berkeley present the lecture



*Monastic Life in Egypt*



*

Dr. Terry Moore

/

University of California, Berkeley

/*



*

Date: Sunday, February 19th, 2006

Time: 2:30 p.m.

Place: 254 Barrows Hall

U. C. Berkeley Campus

------------------------------------------------------------------------



*

Parking is available in U.C. lots after 5 p.m. on weekdays and all day
on weekends for a fee. Ticket dispensing machines accept either $5 bills
or $1.00 bills. The Underhill lot can be entered from Channing way off
College Avenue. Other lots are located along Bancroft. Parking is also
available on the circle drive in front of the Valley Life Sciences
Building which can be entered from Oxford Street. A map of the campus is
available online at

http://www.berkeley.edu/campus_map/

For more information please call 510-527-9746 or send e-mail to
***@uclink4.berkeley.edu <mailto:***@uclink4.berkeley.edu>

------------------------------------------------------------------------



*UPCOMING EVENTS*

All lectures are on Sunday at 2:30 p.m. in Room 20 Barrows Hall on the
U.C. Berkeley Campus unless otherwise noted.

*



March 5th, 2006 2:30 PM

Dr. Josef Wegner, University of Pennsylvania

Secrets of Senwosret III: The 2005 Season at Abydos

20 Barrows Hall, U.C. Berkeley Campus

------------------------------------------------------------------------



April 23rd, 2006 2:30 PM

Dr. Aidan Dodson, University of Bristol

The Rise and Fall of the House of Shoshenq

20 Barrows Hall, U.C. Berkeley Campus

------------------------------------------------------------------------



*

Contact Joan Knudsen by email at ***@berkeley.edu for further
information on ARCE/NC events or by mail at P.O. Box 11352, Berkeley, CA
94712-2352.
Glenn Meyer
2006-02-24 09:54:21 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
/// <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ecartouche/message/5>/

||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
The Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt
and the Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley and the Center for
Middle Eastern Studies, U.C. Berkeley present
the Lecture

Secrets of Senwosret III:
The 2005 Season at Abydos

Dr. Josef Wegner
University of Pennsylvania

Date: Sunday, March 5th, 2006
Time: 2:30 p.m.
Place: 20 Barrows Hall
U. C. Berkeley Campus

Parking is available in U.C. lots after 5 p.m. on weekdays and all day on
weekends for a fee. Ticket dispensing machines accept either $5 bills or $1.00
bills. The Underhill lot can be entered from Channing way off College
Avenue. Other lots are located along Bancroft. Parking is also available on
the circle drive in front of the Valley Life Sciences Building which can be
entered from Oxford Street. A map of the campus is available online at
http://www.berkeley.edu/campus_map/

For more information please call 510-799-9152 or send e-mail to ***@cs.com

The American Research Center in Egypt
Northern California Chapter

439 Buena Vista Avenue
Redwood City, CA94061-4207

http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed/

Copyright 2006 The Board of Directors, The American Research Center
in Egypt, Northern California Chapter. All rights reserved.

About This Lecture

"At Abydos in southern Egypt lies one of the largest royal
tombs constructed in ancient Egypt: the subterranean tomb
of Pharaoh Senwosret III of Dynasty 12. This tomb, part of a
mortuary complex named Wah-Sut-Khakaure, is the first
hidden royal tomb in Egyptian history.

Recent excavation in and around the area of the tomb has
provided evidence of the funerary ceremonies and burial of
Senwosret III at Abydos. His hidden tomb lies beneath a
sacred desert peak that was called Anubis-Mountain. In
2005 the tomb$-1òùs interior was opened for the first time since
it was discovered and briefly examined in 1902. Part of a
program of work to completely excavate, and ultimately
restore, this magnificent royal tomb, the 2005 season
provides a first glimpse of a long ignored triumph of Middle
Kingdom architectural engineering.

The tomb of Senwosret III is a hidden royal burial place
which is key to understanding changing ideas of the royal
afterlife, a missing link between Egypt$-1òùs tradition of royal
pyramids and the later hidden tombs of Egypt$-1òùs pharaohs in
the Valley of the Kings."

-JoeWegner

UPCOMING EVENTS

All lectures are on Sunday at 2:30 p.m. in Room 20
Barrows Hall on the U.C. Berkeley Campus unless otherwisenoted.


March 5th, 2006 2:30 PM

Dr. Josef Wegner, University of Pennsylvania

Secrets of Senwosret III: The 2005 Season at
Abydos

20 Barrows Hall, U.C. Berkeley Campus

April 23rd, 2006 2:30 PM

Dr. Aidan Dodson, University of Bristol

The Rise and Fall of the House of Shoshenq

Phoebe Hearst Museum of Anthropology
Exhibition Hall, Krober Hall, UC Berkeley Campus

April 28-30, 2006 ARCE Annual Meeting

May 21st, 2006 2:30 PM

Dr. Willeke Windrich, UCLA

Egypt$-1òùs Earliest Granaries: Rescue Archaeologyin theFaiyum

20 Barrows Hall, U.C. Berkeley Campus

Contact Bob Bussey by email at ***@cs.com or call 510-799-9152 for
further information on ARCE/NC events or by mail at P.O. Box 11352, Berkeley,
CA 94712-2352.

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Glenn Meyer
2006-02-09 18:49:44 UTC
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The Ancient Egypt Studies Association presents:

Double lecture at Seattle Asian Art Museum, (Volunteer Park),
Sunday March 5th, starting at 2pm. Tickets: $10 for AESA and SAM
members, $16 for non-members

Susan Redford
The Women of the Royal Harim

The women of pharaoh's household lived in secluded quarters of the
palace. They were, in every respect, the property of the king and
their primary function was the king's entertainment. Officially,
the women of the royal harim had no say in the affairs of state,
but on at least three occasions they made an overt attempt to take
matters into their own hands. Who were they? What did they try to
do? And why? An examination of documents and archaeological
monuments may provide some answers and help shed light on these
women who stand in the shadow of history.

Susan Redford is a lecturer at The Pennsylvania State
University. As director of the Akhenaten Temple Project's Theban
Tomb Survey, she has mounted annual expeditions to the Valley of
the Nobles since 1992.


Donald W.Redford
Monotheism: Did It All Start in Egypt?

We owe much in our culture to Ancient Egypt, from the creation of a
civil service, taxation and the earliest calendar down to
monasticism, New-Age-ism and Free Masonry. It has also been claimed
that Akhenaten led the way in devising a new method of looking at
the supernatural which was ancestral to the monotheism we know
today. In light of the incipient clash of monotheistic religions we
are about to experience, let us examine once again the ancient
Egyptian phenomenon of "One Sole God".

Donald W.Redford was professor of Near Eastern Studies at the
Univ. of Toronto. On retirement from that position, he moved to
Penn State Univ., and continues his excavations in the Nile delta.

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***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2006-03-22 08:23:41 UTC
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For immediate release please:

Who: David Moyer
What: Early Dynastic Egypt: the Beginnings of Kingship
Where: Seattle Asian Art Museum (Volunteer Park) Stimson Auditorium,
When: Saturday,March 25th, 2006 at 2:00 pm.

About the AESA event:
This richly illustrated lecture begins with the unification of Egypt
possibly under King Narmer of the famous palette, and chronicles the
kings of Dynasties I and II, the "archaic" period. The tombs of these
kings at Abydos were first excavated in the late 19th and early
20th century by Amelineau and Flinders Petrie. These findings, and
the Dynasty I tombs in Saqqara, excavated by Walter Amery will be
discussed as well as the ongoing re-excavations of the tombs and
funerary enclosures at Abydos , which have resulted in exciting
discoveries. Among these is the fleet of wooden ships buried near the
enclosure of King Khasekhemwy, the last king of the Dynasty II .

About the speaker:
David Moyer, graduate of City University of New York, is interested
mainly in ancient cultures of the Near East. In addition to
lecturing in various colleges in New York area, he has served as a
special correspondent for the quarterly magazine KMT since 1994, with
book review and articles and a column in each issue on the
Egyptological news.

Tickets: members $5, nonmembers $8



Scott Noegel

Dept. Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations
University of Washington
Box 353120
Seattle, WA 98195

Office: 206-543-3606
Dept: 206-543-6033
FAX: 206-685-7936
http://faculty.washington.edu/snoegel/
Glenn Meyer
2006-03-22 08:28:50 UTC
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AESA lectures in Seattle and in Portland:

DAVID MOYER: 'EARLY DYNASTIC EGYPT: THE BEGINNINGS OF KINGSHIP'
At Seattle Asian Art Museum, Saturday, March 25th 2006 2:00 pm

At Portland State University, Smith Memorial Student Union rm. 236
Monday, March 27th, 2006 7:30 pm,

AIDAN DODSON : 'THE RISE AND FALL OF THE HOUSE OF SHOSHENQ'
At Seattle Asian Art Museum, Saturday, April 8th, 2006 2:00 pm

Portland State University, Smith Memorial Student Union Rm 236 Thursday,
April 13th, 2006 at 7:30 pm,

Tickets to all lectures: $5 for AESA members, $8 for non-members

Contact: Liisa, 206.722.9171 or ***@comcast.net
Glenn Meyer
2006-04-04 23:45:50 UTC
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The Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology,
the Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt
and the Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley, present
the Lecture

The Rise and Fall of the House of Shosehenq

By
Dr. Aidan Dodson
University of Bristol

Date: Sunday, April 23, 2006
Time: 2:30 p.m.
Place: Phoebe A. Hearst Museum
U. C. Berkeley Campus

About the Lecture

Dr. Aidan Dodson, Visiting Fellow in Archaeology at the University of
Bristol and the co-author of _The Mummy in Ancient Egypt_ and _The Complete
Royal Families of Ancient Egypt_, will discuss the kings of the 22nd
Dynasty, who ruled Egypt from 948 to 927 B.C.

For more information on the lecture please call 510-799-9152 or send e-mail
to ***@cs.com.

The American Research Center in Egypt
Northern California Chapter

439 Buena Vista Avenue
Redwood City, CA94061-4207

http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed/

About the Museum

Free admission for Museum members, U.C.B. faculty, students, staff and
children 12 and under, General admission $4.00, Seniors $3.00, Non U.C.B
Students (with ID) $1.00 Admission is free every Thursday

The Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology is located in Kroeber Hall on
Bancroft Way at College Avenue on the campus of the University of
California in Berkeley. Gallery entrance is through the Museum Store.

Museum Hours
Wednesday to Saturday 10:00am - 4:30pm, Sunday 12:00pm - 4:00pm

http://hearstmuseum.berkeley.edu

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Glenn Meyer
2006-05-07 06:37:36 UTC
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The Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt,
the Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley
and the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley
present the lecture

Egypt's Earliest Granaries:
Rescue Archaeology in the Faiyum
by Dr. Willeke Wendrich
UCLA

Date: May 21, 2006
Time: 2:30PM
Location: 20 Barrows Hall
U.C. Berkeley Campus

Parking is available in U.C. lots after 5
p.m. on weekdays and all day on weekends for a
$7.00 fee. Ticket dispensing machines accept
either $5 bills or $1.00 bills. The Underhill
lot can be entered from Channing way off
College Avenue. Other lots are located along
Bancroft. Parking is also available on the
circle drive in front of the Valley Life
Sciences Building which can be entered from
Oxford Street. A map of the campus is available
online at

http://www.berkeley.edu/campus_map/

For more information please call 510-527-9746,
send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu, or
go to

http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed/

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Glenn Meyer
2006-05-07 06:50:33 UTC
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Reposting as text attachment for those lists that don't accept HTML.

Glenn
Glenn Meyer
2006-08-11 06:06:47 UTC
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The Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt,
the Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley
and the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley
present the lecture

In Sands Forgotten:
New Abu Sir Cemetery
Of the Vanishing Old Kingdom Pharaohs

by Dr. Miroslav Barta
Czech Institute of Egyptology in Prague & Cairo

Date: August 27, 2006
Time: 2:30PM
Location: 20 Barrows Hall
U.C. Berkeley Campus

Dr. Barta is also Associate Professor of
Egyptology at Charles University, Prague. His
specialties are archaeology and history of the 3rd
and 2nd millennium BC, and include pottery
studies, architecture, economy and religion. His
long term projects include analysis of Old Kingdom
family tombs, Old Kingdom tomb development in Abu
Sir and Saqqara and its socio-religious aspects,
and interconnections between the Levant and Egypt
during the Early and Middle Bronze Ages.

---

Parking is available in U.C. lots after 5
p.m. on weekdays and all day on weekends for a
$7.00 fee. Ticket dispensing machines accept
either $5 bills or $1.00 bills. The Underhill
lot can be entered from Channing way off
College Avenue. Other lots are located along
Bancroft. Parking is also available on the
circle drive in front of the Valley Life
Sciences Building which can be entered from
Oxford Street. A map of the campus is available
online at

http://www.berkeley.edu/campus_map/

For more information please call 510-527-9746,
send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu, or
go to

http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed/

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***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2006-08-14 19:49:37 UTC
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Raw Message
If you live in the San Francisco Bay Area, and would like to take your first
hieroglyphs course, or just brush the cobwebs from your previous study, you
have an opportunity to do that through UC Berkeley Extension. Dr. Theresa
Moore is teaching introductory Middle Kingdom Egyptian Hieroglyphs this
Fall. The following is the announcement from the on-line version of the UC
Berkeley Extension catalog for Fall 2006.

Sign up! You won't regret it.

Glenn
From http://www.unex.berkeley.edu/cat/course1259.html
Ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphics
X119 (3 semester units in Anthropology)

This course offers a unique opportunity to understand the rich
language of an ancient culture. It familiarizes students with the
most common Egyptian hieroglyphic signs and with elementary
grammar. Whenever possible, language exercises relate to Egyptian
history and religion; you are introduced to those royal and
divine names frequently encountered by travelers and museum
visitors, and you study the simple formulae likely to be seen on
funerary objects on exhibit. Each class session includes
discussion and recitation, with review of the exercises for that
week.

Sections now enrolling, by start date and location

Sat. Sept. 2, Berkeley

* 15 meetings
* Sept. 2 to Dec. 16: Sat., 10 am-1 pm (no meeting Nov. 25)
* Berkeley: Room 202, UC Berkeley Extension International Center,
2222 Harold Way
* $495 (EDP 028928)

Instructor

TERESA MOORE, Ph.D., earned a Ph.D. in Egyptology from UC
Berkeley and teaches UC Berkeley Extension courses in ancient
Egyptian history, language, and culture, along with additional
topics related to the ancient Near East. She has taught ancient
Egyptian language at UC Berkeley and received fellowships for
research in Egypt.

Enroll

The textbook(s) for this course may be purchased at the Cal
Student Store
Glenn Meyer
2006-09-03 05:58:49 UTC
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MARIE BUTTERY MEMORIAL PRIZE AND LECTURE

$500 prize


/Marie Buttery, founder and first president of the Northern California
Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt (ARCE), loved every
aspect of Ancient Egypt and was a strong supporter of ARCE for many
years. The Northern California ARCE Chapter is proud to honor Marie by
offering the annual MARIE BUTTERY MEMORIAL PRIZE AND LECTURE in her
memory and in memory of her great love for Egyptology. The award endows
a student lecture in Egyptology that is offered annually by the Northern
California ARCE Chapter./


*ELIGIBILITY*: Any California undergraduate or graduate student


*VALUE OF THE PRIZE*: $500.00, to be presented following the lecture


*TOPIC*: Any aspect of Ancient Egypt, defined as predynastic through
Greco-Roman


*PAPER*: Applicants should submit, in electronic format (PDF, OpenOffice
or Word are preferred), a paper suitable for an illustrated lecture
presentation of approximately 1 hour. *Deadline for Submission is 1
NOVEMBER 2006*. Applicants will be notified of status by not later than
*1 DECEMBER 2006*. Papers will be evaluated on originality, scholarly
caliber, and ability to make the topic come alive to the general public.
Please limit your submission, images included, to 20 pages.


*DATE LECTURE IS TO BE DELIVERED*: Sunday, 10 DECEMBER 2006, at UC
Berkeley, 2:30PM.


*SUBMIT PAPER ELECTRONICALLY TO*: ***@glennmeyer.net
Glenn Meyer
2006-10-09 05:34:42 UTC
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*Reminder: The submission deadline for this lecture is _November 1_.

Glenn
*
Post by Glenn Meyer
MARIE BUTTERY MEMORIAL PRIZE AND LECTURE
$500 prize
/Marie Buttery, founder and first president of the Northern California
Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt (ARCE), loved every
aspect of Ancient Egypt and was a strong supporter of ARCE for many
years. The Northern California ARCE Chapter is proud to honor Marie by
offering the annual MARIE BUTTERY MEMORIAL PRIZE AND LECTURE in her
memory and in memory of her great love for Egyptology. The award
endows a student lecture in Egyptology that is offered annually by the
Northern California ARCE Chapter./
*ELIGIBILITY*: Any California undergraduate or graduate student
*VALUE OF THE PRIZE*: $500.00, to be presented following the lecture
*TOPIC*: Any aspect of Ancient Egypt, defined as predynastic through
Greco-Roman
*PAPER*: Applicants should submit, in electronic format (PDF,
OpenOffice or Word are preferred), a paper suitable for an illustrated
lecture presentation of approximately 1 hour. *Deadline for Submission
is 1 NOVEMBER 2006*. Applicants will be notified of status by not
later than *1 DECEMBER 2006*. Papers will be evaluated on originality,
scholarly caliber, and ability to make the topic come alive to the
general public. Please limit your submission, images included, to 20
pages.
*DATE LECTURE IS TO BE DELIVERED*: Sunday, 10 DECEMBER 2006, at UC
Berkeley, 2:30PM.
Glenn Meyer
2006-09-10 08:16:28 UTC
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The Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt,
the Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley
and the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley
present the lecture

Recent Excavations at the Mut Complex, Luxor

By Dr. Richard A. Fazzini
Brooklyn Museum of Art

Date: Sunday, September 24, 2006
Time: 2:30pm
Location: 20 Barrows Hall
UC Berkeley Campus

---

Parking is available in UC lots after 5
p.m. on weekdays and all day on weekends for a
$7.00 fee. Ticket dispensing machines accept
either $5 bills or $1.00 bills. The Underhill
lot can be entered from Channing way off
College Avenue. Other lots are located along
Bancroft. Parking is also available on the
circle drive in front of the Valley Life
Sciences Building which can be entered from
Oxford Street. A map of the campus is available
online at

http://www.berkeley.edu/campus_map/

For more information please call 510-527-9746,
send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu, or
go to

http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed/

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***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2006-10-08 07:05:51 UTC
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Glenn Meyer
2006-10-30 07:02:17 UTC
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Glenn Meyer
2006-11-22 06:11:59 UTC
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ORIENTAL INSTITUTE DISTANCE LEARNING COURSE

*ANCIENT EGYPTIAN ARCHITECTURE
Emily Teeter
January 22 to May 14, 2007

*One of the greatest and most famous legacies of ancient Egyptian
civilization is its architecture. Explore this rich legacy in an
audiotape course that will trace the architectural history of ancient
Egypt from the Early Dynastic Period to the Roman era. Listen at home,
in the car, or on the go to discover the materials, tools, and
techniques employed by the ancient engineers, the impact of changing
technology on architectural forms, and how myth and ritual are reflected
in the design of ancient Egyptian temples and tombs

Offered on CDs in eight lessons over 16 weeks, the course also includes
special slide presentations on the Oriental Institute website to show
full-color views of ancient sites, artifacts from the Oriental Institute
Museum's galleries, and photographs from the instructor 's personal
collection. Supplemental readings and optional assignments are also
provided. Those who complete all course assignments will receive a
certificate of course completion from the Oriental Institute.

*Instructo*r*:* Emily Teeter, who holds a Ph.D. in Egyptology from the
University of Chicago, is a Research Associate at the Oriental
Institute. She is the author of numerous publications on ancient Egypt,
including/ Ancient Egypt: Treasures from the Collection of the Oriental
Institute/,/ Egypt and the Egyptians/ (with Douglas Brewer), and/
Scarabs, Scaraboids, and Seals from Medinet Habu/.

*Required Texts*:
/Building in Egypt: Pharaonic Stone Masonry/. Dieter Arnold. Oxford,
1991. (paperback)
/The Complete Temples of Ancient Egypt/. Richard Wilkinson. Thames and
Hudson, 2000.

*Tuition*: $295 for Oriental Institute members; $325 for non-members

*For more information*/*:*

Museum Education Office
website:
<http://events.uchicago.edu/oi/eventdetail.phtml?eventid=47034&Month=2&moCatref=|809|&moback=1>
telephone: 1-773-702-9507
e-mail: oi-***@uchicago.edu
/
*


*
Glenn Meyer
2006-11-22 07:28:23 UTC
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Glenn Meyer
2007-01-13 07:22:24 UTC
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*American Research Center in Egypt
Northern California Chapter
Program Schedule - Spring 2007
All lectures will be in Room 20 Barrows Hall
UC Berkeley Campus*


*January 28, 2007 - 2:30 PM*

Recent Work in the Tomb of Senneferi at Thebes

Dr. Nigel Strudwick

2006-2007 Holder of the Hohenberg Chair of Excellence in Art History,
Department of Art, University of Memphis.


*February 18, 2007 - 2:30 PM*

Pharaoh at the Bat: Sports and Games in Ancient Egypt

Dr. Peter Piccioni

Associate Professor of Comparative Ancient History, University of
Charleston.


*March 25, 2007 - 2:30 PM*

Excavations in the Mut Temple Precinct at Karnak

Dr. Betsy Bryan

Professor of Egyptian Art and Archaeology, Johns Hopkins University


*April 15, 2007 - 2:30PM*

Preserving the Past for the Future: Conservation Projects in Egypt

Dr. Michael Jones

Associate Director, Egyptian Antiquities Conservation Project, American
Research Center in Egypt.


*May 20, 2007 - 2:30PM*

Diagnosing Pharaoh: Did Akhenaten have Marfan Syndrome?

Ms. Paula Terry

Independent Researcher


*MORE INFORMATION*


Public parking is available in UC lots on weekends, for a fee.
Ticket dispensing machines accept $5 and $1 bills. A map of the
campus is available online at http://www.berkeley.edu/campus_map .
For further information please call 510 799-9152, send e-mail to
***@uclink4.berkeley.edu <mailto:***@uclink4.berkeley.edu>, or
go to http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed .
<http://home.comcast.net/%7Ehebsed>
Glenn Meyer
2007-01-23 08:39:04 UTC
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Glenn Meyer
2007-02-09 08:12:12 UTC
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The Northern California Chapter Of The American Research Center In Egypt,
The Department Of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley
And The Center For Middle Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley
Present The Lecture

* Pharaoh at the Bat: *
*Sports and Games in Ancient Egypt*

*By Dr. Peter Piccione
Associate Professor of Comparative Ancient History
University of Charleston*

Date: *Sunday, February 18, 2007*
Time: *2:30pm*
Location: *Room 254 Barrows Hall*
*UC Berkeley Campus*


* NOTE THE ROOM CHANGE!!!*


Public parking is available in UC lots
on weekends, for a fee. Ticket dispensing
machines accept $1 and $5 bills. A map of
the campus is available on-line at
http://www.berkeley.edu/campus_map . For
further information please call 510 799-9152,
send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu,
or go to http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed .

|||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
***@glennmeyer.net
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Roland
2007-02-09 11:04:19 UTC
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acd
"Glenn Meyer" <***@glennmeyer.net> wrote in message news:***@glennmeyer.net...

|||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||

The Northern California Chapter Of The American Research Center In Egypt,
The Department Of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley
And The Center For Middle Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley
Present The Lecture

Pharaoh at the Bat:
Sports and Games in Ancient Egypt

By Dr. Peter Piccione
Associate Professor of Comparative Ancient History
University of Charleston

Date: Sunday, February 18, 2007
Time: 2:30pm
Location: Room 254 Barrows Hall
UC Berkeley Campus


NOTE THE ROOM CHANGE!!!




Public parking is available in UC lots
on weekends, for a fee. Ticket dispensing
machines accept $1 and $5 bills. A map of
the campus is available on-line at
http://www.berkeley.edu/campus_map . For
further information please call 510 799-9152,
send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu,
or go to http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed .

|||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2007-03-15 14:41:25 UTC
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The Northern California Chapter of The American Research Center in Egypt,
The Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley
And the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley
Present the Lecture

/The Temple of Mut in the New Kingdom: /
//
/New Evidence for the Goddess and Her Cult/

By Dr. Betsy Brian
Johns Hopkins University

Date: *Sunday, March 25, 2007*
Time: *2:30pm*
Location: *Room 20 Barrows Hall*
*UC Berkeley Campus*

Public parking is available in UC lots
on weekends, for a fee. Ticket dispensing
machines accept $1 and $5 bills. A map of
the campus is available on-line at
http://www.berkeley.edu/campus_map . For
further information please call 510 799-9152,
send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu,
or go to http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed .

|||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2007-03-15 14:43:53 UTC
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Reposting to correct subject line.

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The Northern California Chapter of The American Research Center in Egypt,
The Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley
And the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley
Present the Lecture

/The Temple of Mut in the New Kingdom: /
//
/New Evidence for the Goddess and Her Cult/

By Dr. Betsy Brian
Johns Hopkins University

Date: *Sunday, March 25, 2007*
Time: *2:30pm*
Location: *Room 20 Barrows Hall*
*UC Berkeley Campus*

Public parking is available in UC lots
on weekends, for a fee. Ticket dispensing
machines accept $1 and $5 bills. A map of
the campus is available on-line at
http://www.berkeley.edu/campus_map . For
further information please call 510 799-9152,
send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu,
or go to http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed .

|||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||
***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2007-08-05 06:40:17 UTC
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*ARCE/ NC Program Schedule - Fall 2007
All lectures are on Sunday, 2:30 p.m., Room 20 Barrows Hall,
U.C. Berkeley Campus*

*August 26, 2007*

Excavations in the 9th Pylon at Karnak
Charles Van Siclen
American Research Center in Egypt, Cairo

*
September 30, 2007*

Rethinking the Cause of Tutankhamun's Death
Dr. Benson Harer, MD
Independent Scholar

*
October 21, 2007*

Egypt's Last Two Pyramids: Monuments of Ahmose and Tetisheri
Dr. Stephen Harvey
Pennsylvania-Yale- IFA NYU Expedition to Abydos

*
November 18, 2007*

Excavations at Tudjoi: Update on the El Hibeh Project
Dr. Carol Redmount
Associate Professor of Egyptian Archaeology, U.C. Berkeley.

*
December 9, 2007*

Marie A. Buttery Memorial Student Lecture
Title to be announced.

*MORE INFORMATION
*
Public parking is available in UC lots on weekends, for a fee. Ticket
dispensing machines accept $5 and $1 bills. A map of the campus is
available online at http://www.berkeley.edu/campus_map . For further
information please call 510 799-9152, send e-mail to
***@uclink4.berkeley.edu <mailto:***@uclink4.berkeley.edu>, or go
to http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed . <http://home.comcast.net/%7Ehebsed>
Glenn Meyer
2007-02-15 07:37:18 UTC
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style="text-align: center; margin-bottom: 0in; margin-top: 0in; margin-right: 0in;"><span
style="font-weight: bold; font-size: 14pt; text-decoration: underline;">Free</span><span
style="font-weight: bold; font-size: 14pt;"> AESA lecture in Portland,
OR</span><span style="font-weight: bold; font-size: 16pt;">&nbsp;</span><span
style="font-size: 18pt;">&nbsp;</span></p>
<p class="body default" dir="ltr"
style="text-align: center; margin-bottom: 0in; margin-top: 0in; margin-right: 0in;"><span
style="font-weight: bold; font-size: 14pt;">By Dr. Nigel C. Strudwick:</span></p>
<p class="body default" dir="ltr"
style="text-align: left; margin-bottom: 0in; margin-top: 0in; margin-right: 0in;"><span
style="font-weight: bold; font-size: 14pt;">"Texts from the Pyramid
Age: The Written Records of the Old Kingdom"</span></p>
<p class="body default" dir="ltr"
style="text-align: center; margin-bottom: 0in; margin-top: 0in; margin-right: 0in;"><span
style="font-weight: bold; font-size: 14pt;">Saturday February 24, at
2:30 pm </span><span style="font-size: 14pt;">PSU, Smith Memorial
Student Union Multicultural Center, </span><span
style="font-weight: bold; font-size: 14pt;">Room# 327</span></p>
<p class="body default" dir="ltr"
style="text-align: center; margin-bottom: 0in; margin-top: 0in; margin-right: 0in;"><span
style="font-size: 12pt;">Contact: Liisa Prehn, 206.722.9171 or
<a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:***@comcast.net">***@comcast.net</a><br>
</span></p>
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style="text-align: center; margin-bottom: 0in; margin-top: 0in; margin-right: 0in;"><span
style="font-size: 12pt;"><br>
</span></p>
<p class="body default" dir="ltr"
style="text-align: center; margin-bottom: 0in; margin-top: 0in; margin-right: 0in;"><span
style="font-weight: bold; font-size: 14pt; text-decoration: underline;">Free</span><span
style="font-weight: bold; font-size: 14pt;"> AESA lecture in Seattle,
WA, and in Portland, OR</span></p>
<p class="body default" dir="ltr"
style="text-align: center; margin-bottom: 0in; margin-top: 0in; margin-right: 0in;"><span
style="font-weight: bold; font-size: 14pt;">by Dr. Lawrence M.&nbsp;Berman</span></p>
<p class="body default" dir="ltr"
style="text-align: center; margin-bottom: 0in; margin-top: 0in; margin-right: 0in;"><span
style="font-weight: bold; font-size: 14pt;"> "The Hay-Way Collection
of&nbsp;Egyptian Antiquities: A &nbsp;New Look at the MFA's First Important Gift
of Art." </span></p>
<p class="body default" dir="ltr"
style="text-align: center; margin-bottom: 0in; margin-top: 0in; margin-right: 0in;"><span
style="font-weight: bold; font-style: italic; font-size: 14pt;"> &nbsp;</span></p>
<p class="body default" dir="ltr"
style="text-align: center; margin-bottom: 0in; margin-top: 0in; margin-right: 0in;"><span
style="font-weight: bold; font-size: 14pt;">Seattle: Saturday,&nbsp;March
10, at 6:00 pm</span><span style="font-size: 14pt;">. At the Univ. of
Washington, Savery Hall, room &nbsp;249 (cosponsored by the ARCE-NW)</span></p>
<p class="body default" dir="ltr"
style="text-align: center; margin-bottom: 0in; margin-top: 0in; margin-right: 0in;"><span
style="font-weight: bold; font-size: 14pt;">Portland:</span><span
style="font-size: 14pt;">&nbsp;</span><span
style="font-weight: bold; font-size: 14pt;">Monday, March 12, at 7:30
pm,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 14pt;">PSU, Smith Memorial Student
Union Multicultural Center, room # 236</span></p>
<p class="body default" dir="ltr"
style="text-align: center; margin-bottom: 0in; margin-top: 0in; margin-right: 0in;"><span
style="font-size: 14pt;">Contact: Liisa Prehn, 206-722.9171 or
<a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:***@comcast.net">***@comcast.net</a></span></p>
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style="text-align: left; margin-bottom: 0in; margin-top: 0in; margin-right: 0in;">
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Glenn Meyer
2007-05-07 07:25:54 UTC
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Raw Message
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The Northern California Chapter of The American Research Center in Egypt,
The Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley
And the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley

Present the Lecture


/Diagnosing Pharaoh: Did Akhenaten have Marfan Syndrome?
<http://events.berkeley.edu/?event_ID=821&date=2007-05-20&tab=lectures>/


*Ms. Paula Terry*
*Independent Researcher*


Date: *Sunday, May 20, 2007*
Time: *2:30pm*
Location: *Room 20 Barrows Hall*
*UC Berkeley Campus*

Public parking is available in UC lots
on weekends, for a fee. Ticket dispensing
machines accept $1 and $5 bills. A map of
the campus is available on-line at
http://www.berkeley.edu/campus_map . For
further information please call 510 799-9152,
send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu
<mailto:***@uclink4.berkeley.edu>,
or go to http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed
<http://home.comcast.net/%7Ehebsed> .

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***@glennmeyer.net <mailto:***@glennmeyer.net>
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Glenn Meyer
2007-05-08 08:13:10 UTC
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*The following lecture is a last-minute addition to Northern California
ARCE's 2007 schedule. *

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The Northern California Chapter of The American Research Center in Egypt,
And the Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley,
Present the Lecture

Valley of the Kings Tomb 63
<http://events.berkeley.edu/?event_ID=821&date=2007-05-20&tab=lectures>

/by Dr. Otto Schaden
Director KV10/KV63/

Date: *Sunday, June 3, 2007
*Time: *2:30pm *
Location: *Room 20 Barrows Hall*
*UC Berkeley Campus *

Public parking is available in UC lots
on weekends, for a fee. Ticket dispensing
machines accept $1 and $5 bills. A map of
the campus is available on-line at
http://www.berkeley.edu/campus_map . For
further information please call 510 799-9152,
send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu
<mailto:***@uclink4.berkeley.edu>,
or go to http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed
<http://home.comcast.net/%7Ehebsed> .

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***@glennmeyer.net <mailto:***@glennmeyer.net>
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Glenn Meyer
2007-05-18 15:45:39 UTC
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*ANCIENT ART COUNCIL*
*ANCIENT ART DEPARTMENT*
*Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco*
*LECTURE

*/*Plague in the Time of King Tut's Grandfather,*/
/*Amenhotep III*/

*By ARIELLE KOZLOFF*
Former Curator of Ancient Art
The Cleveland Museum of Art

Amenhotep III (reigned ca. 1390-1352 B.C.) commissioned hundreds of statues
for Sakhmet, the Egyptian goddess of plague and war, during a peaceful
reign.
Historical, art historical, sociological, and literary evidence suggest
that this
period was fraught with terrible disease, very possibly bubonic plague.
*
* Saturday, 19 May 2007, 2:00 PM
Koret Auditorium
*De Young Museum*
50 Hagiwara Tea Garden Drive
Golden Gate Park
San Francisco*
Reception will follow lecture*

AAC members free
$5 general and $3 students
No museum admission required
/Ancient Art Council supports Ancient Art at the Fine Arts Museums/
/
/
Glenn Meyer
2007-06-04 05:45:01 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
The following course covers what some consider the most interesting
dynasty in Ancient Egypt's history, the 18th. I've taken the class from
Dr. Moore, and highly recommend it. Please sign up now if you're
interested. The class starts in less than two weeks. For more
information and to enroll, go to

http://www.unex.berkeley.edu/cat/course906.html

To read about the course, see below. Please note that the description on
the UCB extension website incorrectly indicates that there will be a
field trip to see the Hatshepsut exhibition at the De Young. The
exhibition occurred two years ago, when the course was last offered.
Apparently someone copied the course description without deleting the
mention of the exhibition.

Glenn


The Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt

X156 (2 semester units in Near Eastern Studies)

Hatshepsut, the queen who took the titles of a king, and Tutankhamun,
the young man whose burial astonished the world of archaeology, are
among the best-known rulers of ancient Egypt. But the Eighteenth Dynasty
also included the great warrior and builder Thutmose III, Amenhotep the
Magnificent, and Akhenaten, the "heretic."

This course takes up the art, architecture, history, and literature of
the Eighteenth Dynasty, attending to primary sources ranging from
military annals to the Book of the Dead, from building dedications to
private letters and autobiographies. Special attention is given to the
monuments of Thebes and relevant museum collections.

*Click below for sections, start dates, locations, instructors,
and to enroll.*

Sat. June 16, Berkeley <http://www.unex.berkeley.edu/cat/course906.html#>

*TERESA MOORE,* Ph.D., earned a Ph.D. in Egyptology from UC Berkeley and
teaches UC Berkeley Extension courses in ancient Egyptian history,
language, and culture, along with additional topics related to the
ancient Near East. She has taught ancient Egyptian language at UC
Berkeley and received fellowships for research in Egypt.

* *10 meetings*
* *June 16 to Aug. 18:* Sat., 10 am-1 pm
* *Berkeley:* Room 205, UC Berkeley Extension International Center,
2222 Harold Way
* *$425* */(EDP 015412)/*

*Enroll*
<http://www.unex.berkeley.edu/cgi-bin/mode/enroll.cgi?course=015412>

*Textbook(s) <http://www.unex.berkeley.edu/info/textbook.php> for this
course:*
/Akhenaten, King of Egypt/
Author: Cyril Aldred
Publisher: Thames & Hudson
Edition: reprint edition
Publication Year: 1991
ISBN: 0500278218

*AND*
/Ancient Egyptian Literature, Vol. 2: The New Kingdom/
Author: Miriam Lichtheim (trans.)
Publisher: University of California Press
Edition: 2nd
Publication Year: 2006
ISBN: 0520248430

*AND*
/Hatshepsut: From Queen to Pharaoh/
Author: Catharine H. Roehrig, ed.
Publisher: Metropolitan Museum of Art
Publication Year: 2005
ISBN: 0300111398

*AND*
/The Complete Tutankhamun/
Author: Nicholas Reeves
Publisher: Thames & Hudson
Edition: reprint edition (199
Publication Year: 1990
ISBN: 0500278105
Glenn Meyer
2007-05-09 08:43:13 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Resending to correct the spelling of the lecturer's name. My apologies.

Glenn
Post by Glenn Meyer
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The Northern California Chapter of The American Research Center in Egypt,
The Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley
And the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley
Present the Lecture
/Diagnosing Pharaoh: Did Akhenaten have Marfan Syndrome?
<http://events.berkeley.edu/?event_ID=821&date=2007-05-20&tab=lectures>/
*Ms. Paula Terrey*
*Independent Researcher*
Date: *Sunday, May 20, 2007*
Time: *2:30pm*
Location: *Room 20 Barrows Hall*
*UC Berkeley Campus*
Public parking is available in UC lots
on weekends, for a fee. Ticket dispensing
machines accept $1 and $5 bills. A map of
the campus is available on-line at
http://www.berkeley.edu/campus_map . For
further information please call 510 799-9152,
or go to http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed
<http://home.comcast.net/%7Ehebsed> .
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aezael
2010-02-12 21:42:01 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Why are you posting a notice about a lecture when you can post it on
the internet ? and allow all of us to receive it ?

Glenn Meyer
2004-02-24 22:07:26 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
The American Research Center in Egypt's Northwest Chapter (ARCE/NW) is
pleased to announce the following lecture.
What: "What Tourists Rarely See in Egypt"
Who: Alan Kaye, PhD, Professor of Linguistics,
University of California at Fullerton
When: Thursday, March 4, 2004, 6:30pm
Where: Burke Museum on the University of Washington campus.
Admission: FREE.
<http://home.earthlink.net/~arcenwor/ARCE_Northwest_Chapter.html>
About the talk
Renowned Arabic linguist Alan Kaye will provide a fascinating window into
the "unknown" Egypt that few tourists ever see. This slide presentation is
based on his experiences gathered from his extensive travels in Egypt.
About the speaker
Alan Kaye is Professor of Linguistics at the University of California at
Fullerton. He is the author and editor of eleven books, more than sixty
articles, and over 300 reviews in more than 65 scholarly journals. He also
sits on the editorial boards of 3 monograph series and 10 professional
journals including the Journal of Afroasiatic Languages. Dr. Kaye also is
an extensive world traveler, having spent time as a visiting scholar and
professor in universities in Nigeria, Sri Lanka, Nairobi, Naples, and
Cairo.
Cosponsored with the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture and the
Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilization.
Scott Noegel, President ARCE/NW
Dept. Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations
University of Washington
Box 353120
Seattle, WA 98195
Office: 206-543-3606
Dept: 206-543-6033
FAX: 206-685-7936
http://faculty.washington.edu/snoegel/
--
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Glenn Meyer ANE/Egyptology Enthusiast
Card-Carrying Member of the ACLU Computer Graphics SW Engineer
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