Discussion:
Northern Cal. ARCE/UCB August 2007 Lecture: Excavations in the 9th Pylon at Karnak
(too old to reply)
Glenn Meyer
2007-08-17 07:33:29 UTC
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The Northern California Chapter of The American Research Center in Egypt,
The Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley,
And The Center For Middle Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley

Present the Lecture

Excavations in the 9th Pylon at Karnak

/by /Charles Van Siclen
American Research Center in Egypt, Cairo

Date: Sunday, August 26, 2007
Time: *2:30pm *
Location: *Room 20 Barrows Hall*
UC Berkeley Campus

Public parking is available in UC lots
on weekends, for a fee. Ticket dispensing
machines accept $1 and $5 bills. A map of
the campus is available on-line at
http://www.berkeley.edu/campus_map . For
further information please call 510-799-9152,
send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu
<mailto:***@uclink4.berkeley.edu>,
or go to http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed
<http://home.comcast.net/%7Ehebsed> .

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Glenn Meyer
2007-10-16 05:12:39 UTC
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The Northern California Chapter of The American Research Center in Egypt,
The Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley,
And the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley

Present the Lecture

Egypt's Last Two Pyramids:
Monuments of Ahmose and Tetisheri

/by / Dr. Stephen Harvey
Pennsylvania-Yale-IFA NYU Expedition to Abydos

Sunday, October 21, 2007
*2:30pm*
*Room 20 Barrows Hall*
UC Berkeley Campus

Public parking is available in UC lots
on weekends, for a fee. Ticket dispensing
machines accept $1 and $5 bills. A map of
the campus is available on-line at
http://www.berkeley.edu/campus_map . For
further information please call 510-799-9152,
send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu
<mailto:***@uclink4.berkeley.edu>,
or go to http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed
<http://home.comcast.net/%7Ehebsed/lectures>/lectures.

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Glenn Meyer
2008-01-19 07:14:32 UTC
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The Northern California Chapter of The American Research Center in Egypt,
The Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley,
And the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley

Present the Marie Buttery Memorial Lecture

/*Best Student Paper*//*
*/*Three Asasif Tombs: Interpreting Social Identity*

*By Jean Li
University of California, Berkeley*

*Sunday, January 27, 2008*
*2:30pm*
*Room 20 Barrows Hall*
*UC Berkeley Campus*

Public parking is available in UC lots
on weekends, for a fee. Ticket dispensing
machines accept $1 and $5 bills. A map of
the campus is available on-line at
http://www.berkeley.edu/campus_map . For
further information please call 510-799-9152,
send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu
<mailto:***@uclink4.berkeley.edu>,
or go to http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed
<http://home.comcast.net/%7Ehebsed/lectures>_/__lectures_.

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Glenn Meyer
2008-03-10 06:49:34 UTC
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Glenn Meyer
2008-03-11 06:13:19 UTC
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Resending to Usenet groups, without the HTML:

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The Northern California Chapter of The American Research Center in Egypt,
and the Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley,
present

Politics of Placement:
The Development of the Theban Necropolis in the New Kingdom

A Lecture By

Dr. J. J. Shirley
University of Swansea

Sunday, March 30, 2008
2:30pm
Room 20 Barrows Hall
UC Berkeley Campus

Public parking is available in UC lots
on weekends, for a fee. Ticket dispensing
machines accept $1 and $5 bills. A map of
the campus is available on-line at
http://www.berkeley.edu/campus_map . For
further information please call 510-799-9152,
send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu,
or go to http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed/lectures.htm

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***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2008-05-09 03:24:13 UTC
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The Northern California Chapter of The American Research Center in Egypt,
and the Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley,
present

Christians Lost in the Desert: Work at the Khargha Oasis

A lecture by

Dr. Eugene Cruz-Uribe
University of California, Monterey

Sunday, May 18, 2008
2:30pm
Room 20 Barrows Hall
UC Berkeley Campus

Public parking is available in UC lots
on weekends, for a fee. Ticket dispensing
machines accept $1 and $5 bills. A map of
the campus is available on-line at
http://www.berkeley.edu/campus_map . For
further information please call 510-799-9152,
send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu,
or go to http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed/lectures.htm

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***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2008-08-10 06:30:08 UTC
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The Northern California Chapter of The American Research Center in Egypt,
the Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley,
and the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley,
present a special two-lecture program
on discoveries at the temple of Amenhotep III

New discoveries and recent works
at the funerary temple of Amenhotep III at Kôm el-Hettan

by

Dr. Hourig Sourouzian
German Archaeological Institute

and

Foreign Folks and New Place Names
in the Temple of Amenhotep III at Kom el-Hettan

by
Dr. Rainer Stadelmann
Director Emeritus, German Archaeological Institute

Sunday, August 24, 2008
1:30pm
Room 20 Barrows Hall
UC Berkeley Campus

Because of the length of this meeting, the first lecture will begin at
1:30, not the usual 2:30. There will be a break between lectures, and
you are encouraged to bring finger foods to share during that
intermission. Be sure to allow extra time for what will be a most
enjoyable afternoon. For background on the work by these lecturers at
the temple of the Colossi of Memnon, see the October 2007 issue of
Smithsonian Magazine, or the on-line article at

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history-archaeology/egyptiantemple-200711.html

Public parking is available in UC lots
on weekends, for a fee. Ticket dispensing
machines accept $1 and $5 bills. A map of
the campus is available on-line at
http://www.berkeley.edu/campus_map . For
further information please call 510-799-9152,
send e-mail to ***@uclink4.berkeley.edu
or go to http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed/lectures.htm

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***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2008-08-21 05:48:52 UTC
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Arrangements have been made to provide food for this Sunday's
two-lecture program: Fixins' for pita, falafal, and hummus sandwiches,
among other things. Therefore, please ignore the request for food in the
lecture announcement below, which was sent out last week.

Thanks.

Glenn
Post by Glenn Meyer
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The Northern California Chapter of The American Research Center in Egypt,
the Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley,
and the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley,
present a special two-lecture program
on discoveries at the temple of Amenhotep III
New discoveries and recent works
at the funerary temple of Amenhotep III at Kôm el-Hettan
by
Dr. Hourig Sourouzian
German Archaeological Institute
and
Foreign Folks and New Place Names
in the Temple of Amenhotep III at Kom el-Hettan
by
Dr. Rainer Stadelmann
Director Emeritus, German Archaeological Institute
Sunday, August 24, 2008
1:30pm
Room 20 Barrows Hall
UC Berkeley Campus
Because of the length of this meeting, the first lecture will begin at
1:30, not the usual 2:30. There will be a break between lectures, and
you are encouraged to bring finger foods to share during that
intermission. Be sure to allow extra time for what will be a most
enjoyable afternoon. For background on the work by these lecturers at
the temple of the Colossi of Memnon, see the October 2007 issue of
Smithsonian Magazine, or the on-line article at
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history-archaeology/egyptiantemple-200711.html
Public parking is available in UC lots
on weekends, for a fee. Ticket dispensing
machines accept $1 and $5 bills. A map of
the campus is available on-line at
http://www.berkeley.edu/campus_map . For
further information please call 510-799-9152,
or go to http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed/lectures.htm
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Glenn Meyer
2009-04-15 04:05:28 UTC
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Glenn Meyer
2009-05-07 05:48:03 UTC
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The Northern California Chapter of The American Research Center in Egypt,
and the Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley,
present

*Stair Steps to the Gods:
Building the Great Pyramid at Giza**
**
A Lecture By*

*Dr. Craig Smith
Architectural Engineer*

*Sunday, May 17, 2009*
*2:30pm
Room 20 Barrows Hall*
*UC Berkeley Campus*

Craig B. Smith has been involved in engineering and in large,
complex, construction projects for nearly 40 years. He has served as
project manager or executive in charge for such diverse projects as
earthquake simulation tests at nuclear power plants and dams,
construction of waste-to-energy power plants, large mass transit
systems, design and construction of many large laboratory/research
facilities, airport expansions, and the post-911 renovation of the
Pentagon.

With this background it was natural that he became interested in the
design and construction of the Great Pyramid at Giza. Applying his
knowledge of how large public works projects are accomplished he set
himself the task of unraveling the mystery of the building the Great
Pyramid - the sole survivor of the "Seven Wonders of the Ancient World".

Dr. Smith is the author of seven books, has published short fiction and
non-fiction and has authored more than 100 technical publications. His
professional career began as an Assistant Professor of Engineering at
UCLA where he was also Assistant Director of the Nuclear Energy Lab.
After seven years at UCLA he founded ANCO Engineering Company, an
engineering consulting firm. In 2001 he became president of Daniel,
Mann, Johnson and Mendenhall/Holmes & Navers, Inc, and in 2003, Chairman
of the Board.

Public parking is available in UC lots
on weekends, for a fee. Ticket dispensing
machines accept $1 and $5 bills. An interactive
map of the campus is available on-line at
http://www.berkeley.edu/map/3dmap/3dmap.shtml
<http://www.berkeley.edu/campus_map>
For further information please call 510-527-9746
or send e-mail to ***@comcast.net <mailto:***@comcast.net>

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***@glennmeyer.net <mailto:***@glennmeyer.net>
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Glenn Meyer
2009-05-15 05:13:21 UTC
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Before and after this Sunday's lecture, there will be a book sale to
benefit the Near Eastern Studies department's Baer-Keller Library. These
books come from the estate of Candy Keller and possibly other sources.

Glenn
Post by Glenn Meyer
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The Northern California Chapter of The American Research Center in Egypt,
and the Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley,
present
Building the Great Pyramid at Giza**
**
A Lecture By*
*Dr. Craig Smith
Architectural Engineer*
*Sunday, May 17, 2009*
*2:30pm
Room 20 Barrows Hall*
*UC Berkeley Campus*
Craig B. Smith has been involved in engineering and in large,
complex, construction projects for nearly 40 years. He has served as
project manager or executive in charge for such diverse projects as
earthquake simulation tests at nuclear power plants and dams,
construction of waste-to-energy power plants, large mass transit
systems, design and construction of many large laboratory/research
facilities, airport expansions, and the post-911 renovation of the
Pentagon.
With this background it was natural that he became interested in the
design and construction of the Great Pyramid at Giza. Applying his
knowledge of how large public works projects are accomplished he set
himself the task of unraveling the mystery of the building the Great
Pyramid - the sole survivor of the "Seven Wonders of the Ancient World".
Dr. Smith is the author of seven books, has published short fiction
and non-fiction and has authored more than 100 technical publications.
His professional career began as an Assistant Professor of Engineering
at UCLA where he was also Assistant Director of the Nuclear Energy
Lab. After seven years at UCLA he founded ANCO Engineering Company,
an engineering consulting firm. In 2001 he became president of
Daniel, Mann, Johnson and Mendenhall/Holmes & Navers, Inc, and in
2003, Chairman of the Board.
Public parking is available in UC lots
on weekends, for a fee. Ticket dispensing
machines accept $1 and $5 bills. An interactive
map of the campus is available on-line at
http://www.berkeley.edu/map/3dmap/3dmap.shtml
<http://www.berkeley.edu/campus_map>
For further information please call 510-527-9746
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Glenn Meyer
2009-08-17 05:14:31 UTC
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The Northern California Chapter of The American Research Center in Egypt,
the Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley,
and the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley,
present

*The Joint Expedition to Malqata:**
The Palace of Amenhotep III*

*A Lecture By*

Dr. Diana Craig Patch
Associate Curator, Department of Egyptian Art
The Metropolitan Museum of Art

*Sunday, August 30, 2009*
*2:30pm
Room 20 Barrows Hall*
*UC Berkeley Campus*

The palace-city of Malqata has been the focus of several archaeological
expeditions in the past century. Teams from The Metropolitan Museum of
Art, the University of Pennsylvania, and Waseda University have
uncovered or studied Malqata's harbor, temple, palaces, and numerous
residential areas, which make up much of the site. On December 4, 2008,
The Joint Expedition to Malqata began a new project which focused on
surveying and mapping the entire palace-city of Amenhotep III, a site
that stretches almost 6 km along the low desert. The goal was to tie all
the extant plans and maps of the region into a cohesive map in order to
assist the Supreme Council of Egypt in better protecting the site. Much
work remains to improve our understanding of the Amenhotep III's vision
for his palace-city at Malqata.

(Chapter election results will be announced at this meeting.)

Public parking is available in UC lots
on weekends, for a fee. Ticket dispensing
machines accept $1 and $5 bills. An interactive
map of the campus is available on-line at
http://www.berkeley.edu/map/3dmap/3dmap.shtml
<http://www.berkeley.edu/campus_map>
For further information please call 510-527-9746
or send e-mail to ***@comcast.net <mailto:***@comcast.net>

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***@glennmeyer.net <mailto:***@glennmeyer.net>
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Glenn Meyer
2009-08-17 06:22:59 UTC
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I've had one complaint about weird formatting in this announcement that
made parts of the text invisible. If you're having the same problem,
please check the CraigsList posting at
http://sfbay.craigslist.org/eby/eve/1327081766.html . Sorry for any
inconvenience. For those of you in newsgroups, I've also attached a
text-only version.

Glenn
Glenn Meyer
2009-09-13 02:32:29 UTC
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The Northern California Chapter of The American Research Center in Egypt,
the Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley,
and the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley,
present

*Ancient Nubia
A New View from the Fourth Cataract**
**
A Lecture By*

*Dr. Brenda Baker
Arizona State University
*

*Sunday, September 27, 2009*
*2:30pm
Room 20 Barrows Hall*
*UC Berkeley Campus*

Public parking is available in UC lots
on weekends, for a fee. Ticket dispensing
machines accept $1 and $5 bills. An interactive
map of the campus is available on-line at
http://www.berkeley.edu/map/3dmap/3dmap.shtml
<http://www.berkeley.edu/campus_map>
For further information please call 650-367-8339
or send e-mail to ***@comcast.net <mailto:***@comcast.net>

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***@glennmeyer.net <mailto:***@glennmeyer.net>
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Glenn Meyer
2009-10-11 04:52:22 UTC
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The Northern California Chapter of The American Research Center in Egypt,
the Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley,
and the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley,
present

*King Tut's Medicine Cabinet**

A Lecture By*

*Dr. Lise Manniche
University of Copenhagen
*

*Sunday, October 18, 2009*
*2:30pm
Room 20 Barrows Hall*
*UC Berkeley Campus*

The tomb of Tutankhamun contained a significant amount of plant remains.
As we have
no other intact, royal tombs, we do not know if this was the norm. Many
of them, however, have
specific medicinal properties, and it is interesting to examine whether
they were placed in the tomb
for funerary use, or whether the boy king may have found use for them
in his short life. This came
to an abrupt end, and we shall review the most recent suggestions for
the possible causes of death.

Public parking is available in UC lots
on weekends, for a fee. Ticket dispensing
machines accept $1 and $5 bills. An interactive
map of the campus is available on-line at
http://www.berkeley.edu/map/3dmap/3dmap.shtml
<http://www.berkeley.edu/campus_map>
For further information please call 650-367-8339
or send e-mail to ***@comcast.net

<mailto:***@comcast.net>

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***@glennmeyer.net <mailto:***@glennmeyer.net>
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Glenn Meyer
2009-11-01 06:39:45 UTC
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Dear Egypt enthusiast,
Below is an event co-sponsored by ARCE and NELC that you might find of
interest.
***********
The Pursuit of Queen Teya, who Killed Ramses III (1186-1155 B.C.)
Dr. Benson Harer
Thursday, December 3
6:30-8:00 pm
Gowen Hall (UW campus), room 201
Free Admission
About the presentation
In a treasonous conspiracy the women of the harem of Ramses III murdered
him. They were led by his secondary Queen, Teya, who sought to put her
son, Pentawere, on the throne instead of the rightful heir, Ramses IV.
BUT there was a flaw that caused the scheme to fail. The trial records
of the
conspirators who murdered King Ramses III are well preserved. Pentawere's
fate was to commit suicide. This talk addresses the current pursuit of
Queen Teya.
About the speaker
Professor W. Benson Harer was educated at Princeton University,
University
of Pennsylvania Medical School, and Residency in OB-GYN at Hospital of
the
University of PA. Tours to Egypt in 1974 and 1978 sparked a strong
interest in Egypt, leading to joining the Theban Mapping Project
expedition in 1979. W. Benson Harer has returned with expeditions
every year, and has studied Egyptology intensively. He was elected a
National Fellow of the Explorer's Club, and is a member of the Egypt
Exploration Society and of the Egyptology Committee of the
International Council of Museums. He was the first non-academic
elected to the Board of Governors of the American Research Center in
Egypt and has held that position from 1984 to 2009. Specializing in
Ancient Egyptian Medicine, he has lectured and published
internationally. He was appointed an Adjunct Professor in the
Department of Humanities at California State University San Bernardino
in 1993 and in 2001 was further honored with a Doctor of Humane
Letters degree-the first awarded by the University in its 35 year
existence.
All the best,
scott noegel
Prof. & Chair, Dept. Near Eastern Languages & Civilization
University of Washington
Box 353120
Seattle, WA 98195
Office: 206-543-3606
Dept: 206-543-6033
FAX: 206-685-7936
http://faculty.washington.edu/snoegel/
Glenn Meyer
2009-10-30 04:05:27 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
*******************************************************************

Wednesday November 4th, 2009 4 pm UC Berkeley Campus, 254 Barrows Hall

Elite Egyptian burial and self-presentation in Ptolemaic Egypt

Lecture by Professor Jacco Dieleman, Assistant Professor of Egyptology,
Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, UCLA

Discussants:

Stephanie Langin-Hooper, Graduate Student, Dept. of Near Eastern Studies

Jean Li, Graduate Student, Dept. of Near Eastern Studies


Abstract: In the Hellenistic Period, Egypt was home to an ethnically mixed
population. Indigenous Egyptians formed a large majority, but by now they
shared the land with a considerable number of settlers from abroad. Among
these settlers, Greeks formed the largest and most
important minority group, ruling the country since the conquest by
Alexander the Great in 332 BCE and the subsequent establishment of
Ptolemaic rule. This influx of Greeks resulted in the coexistence of two
spheres of life in Egyptian society, i.e. Greek and Egyptian,
distinguished on the basis of language, cultural practices, and legal
status. The Greek sphere was associated with government and social
mobility, the Egyptian sphere with indigenous culture. In the course of
the Ptolemaic period, more and more individuals were willing to, and
capable of, partaking in both of these spheres of life. This aspect of
Ptolemaic society is most insightfully exemplified by the practice of an
individual carrying both an Egyptian and a Greek name, and using one over
the other depending on the situation. But how did this aspect play out in
death? Did one choose to be buried and commemorated in Greek or Egyptian
fashion? This paper will review three cases of elite
self-presentation on funerary monuments in which the deceased poses as
both Egyptian and Greek in text and/or image. What does this say about the
ethnic and cultural identity of these individuals? And what kind of social
imaginary or imagined community underlies these constructions of identity?


This lecture is the part of the Memory and Identity Working Group
lecture series.

Memory and Identity Working Group meetings are designed to encourage
dialogue across the department's diverse traditions.


Event Contact: Benjamin Porter, Assistant Professor of Near Eastern
Archaeology, Department of Near Eastern Studies,
***@berkeley.edu, 510-642-7794, or visit http://berkeleymemoryid.com/

Jean Li, C.Phil.
Egyptian Art and Archaeology, Department of Near Eastern Studies
University of California, Berkeley
***@berkeley.edu
Glenn Meyer
2009-11-04 06:36:08 UTC
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The Northern California Chapter of The American Research Center in Egypt,
the Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley,
and the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley,
present

*/A Landscape of People and Politics:
The Abydos Middle Cemetery Project/*
*
A Lecture By
Dr. Janet Richards
University of Michigan
*

Cemetery B, the Middle Cemetery at Abydos, lies just to the
northeast of Umm el-Qa'ab, along the ancient procession-way.
Originally the burial grounds for predynastic royalty,
the Middle Cemetery became the burial grounds for non-royal
elites during the Old Kingdom Period. Dr. Richards is
currently responsible for excavations in Cemetery B, as director
of the Middle Cemetery Project.

*Sunday, November 15, 2009*
*2:30pm
Room 20 Barrows Hall*
*UC Berkeley Campus
*

* Annual Suq before and after the meeting:
The Suq will be in Room 20 Barrows Hall

COME EARLY!!! *

Public parking is available in UC lots
on weekends, for a fee. Ticket dispensing
machines accept $1 and $5 bills. An interactive
map of the campus is available on-line at
http://www.berkeley.edu/map/3dmap/3dmap.shtml
<http://www.berkeley.edu/campus_map>
For further information please go to
http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed/, call 650-367-8339,
or send e-mail to ***@comcast.net

<mailto:***@comcast.net>

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Glenn Meyer
2009-11-11 05:33:55 UTC
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Raw Message
The Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilization at the
University of Washington (UW) and the American Research Center's
Who: Dr. Donald Reid (Professor Emeritus, Georgia State University, and
Affiliate Faculty UW)
Topic: "Contested Heritage: Ancient Egypt and the Paradigm of Western
Civilization"
When: 6:30 PM, Monday, November 16, 2009
Where: CMU 120 (Univerrsity of Washington Campus)
Map: http://www.washington.edu/home/maps/northcentral.html?95,71,812,364
In Edwin Blashfield's painting "Evolution of Civilization" in the dome
of the Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress (inaugurated in
1897), figures representing ancient Egypt and modern America sit side
by side-- the presumed beginning and culmination of civilizational
progress. Reading around the dome, the intervening figures round out
an early version of the intellectual construct that became canonized
in American universities and colleges between the two world wars as
the Western Civilization
course. Focusing primarily on Egypt, the lecture considers the
strengths and weaknesses of the Western Civilization paradigm, with
particular attention to Western imperialism and Egyptian nationalism
over the course of the 19th and 20th centuries.
Donald Reid is the author of Whose Pharaohs? Archaeology, Museums, and
Egyptian National Identity from Napoleon to World War I (2002), Cairo
University and the Making of Modern Egypt (1990), and other works on
Egypt and the modern Middle East.
Thanks,
Scott Noegel
Prof. & Chair, Dept. Near Eastern Languages & Civilization
University of Washington
Box 353120
Seattle, WA 98195
Office: 206-543-3606
Dept: 206-543-6033
FAX: 206-685-7936
http://faculty.washington.edu/snoegel/
Glenn Meyer
2009-11-19 06:54:36 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On February 5 and 6, Humanities West is presenting a two-day series
lectures by noted scholars on */Alexander/Alexandria: The Flowering of
Hellenistic Culture/*, at Herbst Theatre in San Francisco.
http://www.humanitieswest.org/

*
P O Box 546, San Francisco, CA 94104. 415 391 9700.
*_****@humanitieswest.org* <mailto:***@humanitieswest.org>_* .
*_*www.humanitieswest.org* <http://www.humanitieswest.org/>_* *


/Alexander/Alexandria: The Flowering of Hellenistic Culture/



Sponsored by Consul General of Greece, Grants for the Arts/SF Hotel
Tax Fund, George and Judy Marcus Family Foundation, Center for Middle
East Studies, UC Berkeley; Stanford Humanities Center; Co-sponsored by
the Modern Greek Studies Center, San Francisco State University.


/*Tickets available now: City Box Office. 415 392 4400.
*/_/*www.cityboxoffice.com*/ <http://www.cityboxoffice.com/>_/* */

*February 5 and 6, 2010. **Herbst Theatre, **401 Van Ness Avenue,** San
Francisco*


Alexander conquered the vast Persian Empire and founded Alexandria
before dying in his 33rd year in 323 BCE. In the aftermath, Greek
literature, learning, and art intermingled with Egyptian, Iranian,
Babylonian, and Hebrew cultures. The interplay of cultures caused
ethnic, artistic, and religious conflicts and convergence. Nowhere did
this convergence of cultures emerge more dramatically than in
Alexandria, which became the royal seat of Hellenistic Egypt. Its Great
Library and Museum and its Lighthouse---one of the wonders of the
ancient world--became magnets for travelers from all around the
Mediterranean and beyond. Though Alexandria's original Library was
destroyed long ago, another has risen from its ashes, and the luster of
Hellenistic Civilization that flourished for three centuries after
Alexander still endures.

Moderator: *William S. Greenwalt* (Professor of Classics, Santa Clara
University)


*Friday, February 5, 2010, 8-10 pm*

/Alexander the Great: Agent for Change?/* **Eugene N. Borza* (Professor
Emeritus of Ancient History at The Pennsylvania State University).Two
things are certain about Alexander the Great. One is that he is among
the greatest military commanders of all time. The other is that the
eastern Mediterranean and western Asian worlds were transformed because
of his passage, resulting in the penetration of Greek culture into
previously non-Hellenic parts of the world. To what extent was the
introduction of Greek culture into Egypt and the East the result of a
deliberate policy of Hellenization? Did Alexander, a pupil of Aristotle
who himself had made clear distinctions between Greeks and "barbarians,"
have a deliberate policy of introducing Greek culture into the
"barbarian" world? How do we go about attempting to answer these
questions? And following from this, one must ask to what extent Hellenic
culture---whatever its source---actually penetrated deeply into native
cultures such as Ptolemaic Egypt during the Hellenistic Era.

* */Picturing Ptolemaic Egypt: The Nile Mosaic from Praeneste. /*Andrew
Stewart *(Professor of Art History, UC Berkeley). The huge and
spectacular Nile Mosaic from Praeneste (ancient Palestrina) in Italy,
discovered in 1600, transferred to Rome in 1626, returned in 1640, and
now heavily restored, remains our best guide not to Ptolemaic Egypt as
such, but to Ptolemaic /attitudes/ to Egypt. Labeled in Greek, it
faithfully pictures many key elements of Ptolemaic material culture from
drinking vessels to temples, and must echo a Ptolemaic painting of the
third or second centuries BCE. This lecture examines its threefold image
of the country: the Hellenized Delta; the Egyptian /chora/; and the
wilds of Nubia.

*Saturday, February 6, 2010, 10:00 am-12 noon and 1:30 pm to 4:00 pm*

* */The Ancient Library at Alexandria: Facts and Fictions/. *Susan
Stephens* (Professor of Classics, Stanford University). Founded by
Alexander in his conquest of the eastern Mediterranean and ruled by a
line of his successors, the Ptolemies, Alexandria was the city from
which Greeks now ruled over the land of the pharaohs. It was also a city
in which Greek and Egyptian cultures must have mixed. The famous
Alexandrian library is a case in point. To what extent it was inspired
by previous Greek models? Could Egyptian temple libraries have played a
role? What was the scribal culture like that enabled the collection and
maintenance of so many books? What roles did scholar-poets like
Callimachus or Apollonius play in shaping the culture of the early
city? What happened to the library? Did the Romans destroy it by
accident? The Christians? The Muslims? Or simply time itself?

* */Jewish Culture in Alexandria: The Hebrew Bible in Greek/. *Erich
Gruen* (Professor of the Graduate School-Wood Professor, UC Berkeley). A
wonderful and witty legend has it that Ptolemy II, the Hellenistic ruler
of Egypt, summoned the most learned Jewish scholars from Jerusalem to
his court to render the Hebrew Bible into Greek. The scholars performed
that task with precision, earning the gratitude of the Greek-speaking
Jewish community, and Ptolemy added the sacred translation to the
shelves of his magnificent library in Alexandria. The lecture employs
this tale, however fictitious it may be, as an illuminating window on
the place of Jewish culture in the life of Alexandria and on the
relationship between Jewish intellectuals and the Hellenistic monarchy
in Egypt.

* */The Ptolemaic Alexandria Poetry of Modern Greek Poet Constantine
Cavafy/. *Martha Klironomos* (Professor of English and Modern Greek
Studies, Director of the Center for Modern Greek Studies, the Nikos
Kazantzakis Chair, San Francisco State University) presents the poetry
in Greek of Alexandria-born modern poet Constantine Cavafy set in
Ptolemaic Alexandria, with Professor Klironomos's own translations of
the poetry in English.

* */Alexander's Pictorial Legacy/. *Ada Cohen* (Professor of Art
History, Dartmouth College). Textual and visual sources suggest that
Alexander the Great was not just a brutal conqueror but that he also
possessed and exhibited a certain human complexity. The impression that
he also aspired to the life of the mind contributes to his fame. This
lecture addresses various layers of complexity embedded within works of
art depicting Alexander or other "model" men of his cultural
environment, which often highlight aggression. It also demonstrates the
longevity of visual paradigms that became dominant in Alexander's era
and explores aspects of the evolution of Alexander's image over time.


/*Concluding Panel Discussion */with Presenters and Written Questions
from Audience


/*Related Programs in San Francisco: Book Discussion on January 13.
Lectures on February 2 and 4. Salon on February 11. See details at
*/_/*www.humanitieswest.org*/ <http://www.humanitieswest.org/>_/*. */
Glenn Meyer
2010-01-11 05:36:21 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
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The Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt,
the Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley
and the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley
Present the lecture

Cleopatra as CEO:
Bureaucracy and Scandal in the Hostile Takeover
of a 1st Century BCE Multinational

by Dr. Janet H. Johnson
Professor of Egyptology
Oriental Institute, University of Chicago

January 24, 2010

2:30 p.m.
20 Barrows Hall
UC Campus, Berkeley
*
Dr. Janet H. Johnson, a former director of the Oriental Institute
at the University of Chicago(1983-1989), is currently the Morton
D. Hull Distinguished Service Professor of Egyptology in the
Oriental Institute's Department of Near Eastern Languages and
Civilizations, and in the Program on the Ancient Mediterranean
World in the Department of Classics. Her main interests include
Egyptian language and Egypt in the Late Period (1st millennium
BC). Dr. Johnson is the Director of the Chicago Demotic
Dictionary Project and Director of the Egyptian Readingbook Project.


*Parking is available in U.C. lots after 5 p.m. on weekdays
and all day on weekends for a fee. Ticket dispensing
machines accept either $5 bills or $1 bills. Parking is
available in Parking Structure B on Bancroft between Hearst
Gym and Kroeber Hall and just across the street from the
University Art Museum. Parking is also available on the
circle drive in front of the Valley Life Sciences Building
which can be entered from Oxford Street or behind Dwinelle
Hall which can also be entered from Oxford Street at the
Track and Field Stadium. A map of the campus is available
online at http://www.berkeley.edu/map/. For more information
please call 650-367-8339 or send e-mail to ***@comcast.net.

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***@glennmeyer.net
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Glenn Meyer
2010-02-12 07:58:53 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
<head>
<meta content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type">
</head>
<body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000">
<div class="moz-text-html" lang="x-western">
<div style="text-align: center;"><big><tt><span
style="font-family: monospace;">|||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||</span></tt></big><br
style="font-family: monospace;">
<br style="font-family: monospace;">
<tt><span style="font-family: monospace;">The Northern California
Chapter
of the American Research Center in Egypt,</span></tt><br
style="font-family: monospace;">
<tt><span style="font-family: monospace;">the Department of Near
Eastern
Studies, UC Berkeley</span></tt><br style="font-family: monospace;">
<tt><span style="font-family: monospace;">and the Center for Middle
Eastern
Studies, UC Berkeley</span></tt><br style="font-family: monospace;">
<tt><span style="font-family: monospace;">present the lecture</span></tt><br
style="font-family: monospace;">
<br style="font-weight: bold;">
<big><big style="font-weight: bold; color: rgb(51, 51, 255);"><span
style="font-family: monospace;">Protecting Cultural Sites in a Living
Environment<br>
</span></big></big><br style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-weight: bold;">
<span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-weight: bold;">Dr. Michael
Jones</span><br style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-weight: bold;">
<span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-weight: bold;">Director, Egypt
Antiquities Project<br>
ARCE, Cairo</span><br style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-weight: bold;">
<br style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-weight: bold;">
<span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-weight: bold;">Dina Saad <br>
ARCE Funds Development</span><br
style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-weight: bold;">
<span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-weight: bold;">ARCE, USA</span><br
style="font-family: monospace; color: rgb(255, 0, 0);">
<br style="font-family: monospace;">
<tt style="font-weight: bold;"><span style="font-family: monospace;">February
21, 2010</span></tt><tt><span
style="font-family: monospace; color: rgb(255, 0, 0); font-weight: bold;"></span></tt><br
style="font-family: monospace;">
<tt><span style="font-family: monospace; font-weight: bold;"></span></tt><br
style="font-family: monospace; font-weight: bold;">
<tt><span style="font-family: monospace; font-weight: bold;"></span><span
style="font-family: monospace; font-weight: bold;">2:30 p.m.</span></tt><tt><span
style="font-family: monospace; font-weight: bold;"></span></tt><br
style="font-family: monospace; font-weight: bold;">
<tt><span style="font-family: monospace; font-weight: bold;">20 Barrows
Hall</span></tt><br style="font-family: monospace; font-weight: bold;">
<tt><span style="font-family: monospace; font-weight: bold;">UC Campus,
Berkeley<br>
</span></tt><small><strong><br>
</strong></small><tt><span style="font-family: monospace;"></span></tt><small>Parking&nbsp;
is available&nbsp; in U.C.&nbsp; lots after&nbsp; 5 p.m.&nbsp; on weekdays&nbsp; and all&nbsp; day on<br>
weekends for&nbsp; a fee.&nbsp; Ticket dispensing&nbsp; machines accept either&nbsp; $5
bills&nbsp; or $1<br>
bills. Parking&nbsp; is available in Parking&nbsp; Structure B on&nbsp; Bancroft
between Hearst<br>
Gym&nbsp; and&nbsp; Kroeber Hall&nbsp; and&nbsp; just&nbsp; across the&nbsp; street&nbsp; from&nbsp; the
University&nbsp; Art<br>
Museum. Parking&nbsp; is also available&nbsp; on the circle&nbsp; drive in front of&nbsp;
the Valley<br>
Life&nbsp; Sciences&nbsp; Building which&nbsp; can&nbsp; be entered&nbsp; from&nbsp; Oxford&nbsp; Street
or&nbsp; behind<br>
Dwinelle Hall,&nbsp; which can&nbsp; also be entered&nbsp; from Oxford&nbsp; Street at the&nbsp;
Track and<br>
Field&nbsp;&nbsp; Stadium.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; A&nbsp;&nbsp; map&nbsp;&nbsp; of&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; the&nbsp;&nbsp; campus&nbsp;&nbsp; is&nbsp;&nbsp; available&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
online&nbsp;&nbsp; at<br>
<a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://www.berkeley.edu/map/">http://www.berkeley.edu/map/</a>. For&nbsp; more information please&nbsp; call
650-367-8339 or<br>
send e-mail to <a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:***@comcast.net">***@comcast.net</a>.<br>
<br style="font-family: monospace;">
</small>
<big><tt><span style="font-family: monospace;">|||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||</span></tt></big><br
style="font-family: monospace;">
<tt><span style="font-family: monospace;"><a
class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:***@glennmeyer.net">***@glennmeyer.net</a></span></tt><br
style="font-family: monospace;">
<big><tt><span style="font-family: monospace;">|||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||</span></tt></big><br
style="font-family: monospace;">
</div>
</div>
</body>
</html>
Glenn Meyer
2010-03-03 06:25:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
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The Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt,
the Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley
and the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley
present the lecture

A Complete Cosmos: The Coffins of Tomb 10A

Dr. Lawrence M. Berman
Norma Jean Calderwood Senior Curator
Of Ancient Egyptian, Nubian and Near Eastern Art
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

March 21, 2010

2:30 p.m.
20 Barrows Hall
UC Campus, Berkeley

In April 1915 the Harvard University-Boston Museum of Fine Arts
Expedition discovered the tomb of Governor Djehutynakht and his wife
at Deir el-Bersha in Middle Egypt about 175 miles south of Cairo. The
contents of this early Twelfth Dynasty tomb were awarded to the Museum in
their entirety by the Egyptian Government and are the focus of the special
exhibition, ?Secrets of Tomb 10A: Egypt 2000 BC,? currently on
view at the MFA. They include well known masterpieces of Egyptian art
like the outer coffin of Governor Djehutynakht and the procession of
offering bearers known as the Bersha Procession, as well as the
largest collection of wooden models ever found in one tomb?57 boats
and 33 models of daily life, newly conserved and restored especially
for this exhibition.


The lecture focuses on the coffins of Tomb 10A: two for Governor
Djehutynakht, and two?unpublished and never before on view?for
his wife, Lady Djehutynakht. Like the models, the coffins from tomb
10A comprise a wonderfully complete and self-contained set. Made of
imported cedar, decorated inside and out, and amply furnished with
texts, these coffins were the best that wealth and position could
buy. While the outer coffin of Governor Djehutynakht stands out as a
masterpiece of Middle Egyptian painting, its beautiful paintings were
never intended to be admired purely as works of art. To appreciate
the coffins properly, we have to consider the famous coffin along
with the others, and the texts along with the pictures. Together,
they tell us not so much about the day-to-day world of the
Djehutynakhts and their peers, but about their cosmos and how they
perceived their place in it. They reveal their hopes and fears, from
not having one's magic taken away by demons to sublime visions of
an eternity spent in the company of Osiris, king of the dead, or
sailing across the sky with the sun god.


Parking is available in U.C. lots after 5 p.m. on weekdays and all
day on weekends for a fee. Ticket dispensing machines accept either
$5 bills or $1 bills. Parking is available in Parking Structure B on
Bancroft between Hearst Gym and Kroeber Hall and just across the
street from the University Art Museum. Parking is also available on
the circle drive in front of the Valley Life Sciences Building which
can be entered from Oxford Street or behind Dwinelle Hall, which can
also be entered from Oxford Street at the Track and Field Stadium. A
map of the campus is available online at http://www.berkeley.edu/map/.
For more information please call 650-367-8339 or send e-mail to
***@comcast.net.

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***@glennmeyer.net
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