Discussion:
Jan. 10 Northern Cal. Egyptology Lecture: 21st Cent. Digital Technologies Meet Pharaonic Information Systems
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Glenn Meyer
2015-12-30 07:00:30 UTC
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PLEASE NOTE THE CHANGE IN LOCATION, FOR THIS LECTURE ONLY!!

The Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt; the Department of Near
Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley; and the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley, are sponsoring
the following lecture:

21st Century Digital Technologies Meet Pharaonic Information Systems:
Using 3D Modeling and Digital Imaging to Record Ancient Inscriptions
In the Great Hypostyle Hall of Karnak Temple

By Dr. Peter Brand, Dunavant Professor of Ancient History
Department of History, University of Memphis

WHEN: 2:30 p.m. Sunday, January 10, 2016
WHERE: Drawing Room, Berkeley City Club, 2315 Durant Ave., Berkeley, CA
There is no admission, but donations are welcomed.

ABOUT THE LECTURE

The 134 giant sandstone columns of the Great Hypostyle Hall are a virtual petrified forest, each of
them blanketed with thousands of hieroglyphic texts and hundreds of elaborately carved scenes
representing kings and gods. This dazzling array of ancient information technology has long daunted
visitors and even scholars attempting to decode this complex three-dimensional matrix of pharaonic
history and culture. A fourth dimension is the passage of 33 centuries since the pharaohs Seti I and
Ramesses II constructed the Great Hypostyle Hall around 1300 BCE. Since then, several pharaohs, High
Priests, Medieval squatters and visitors from the Greco-Roman period down to today have literally
left their marks with new inscriptions, graffiti and even iconoclastic vandalism of human and animal
forms in the scenes and hieroglyphs. Using 3D modeling, digital photography and other high tech
methods, the Hypostyle Hall Project is now recording and decoding this titanic ancient "puzzle box,"
revealing new insights into how the Egyptians created such artistic marvels and the subtle coded
language of the hieroglyphic "software" that served as a magical operating system for this vast
pharaonic machine.

ABOUT THE LECTURER

Peter Brand is a Canadian Egyptologist from Toronto, Ontario, and a naturalized American citizen. He
is the Dunavant Professor of Ancient History at the Department of History, University of Memphis and
also the Director of the Karnak Great Hypostyle Hall Project of the University of Memphis, which
aims to record and publish all the monumental inscriptions and reliefs from this huge building.

Brand studied at the University of Texas at Arlington and the University of Memphis and completed
his PhD in Ancient Egyptian Language and Literature University of Toronto in 1998. His dissertation
The Monuments of Seti I: Epigraphic, Historical and Art Historical Analysis, which was published by
Brill in 2000 is considered to be one of the most comprehensive studies on the reign of Seti I who
is often eclipsed in history by the glorious 66-year reign of his son, Ramesses II. The book
contains a catalogue of most of Seti I's monuments and an important discussion of the historical
significance and reigns of Ramesses I and Seti I. He is also and co-editor (with Louise Cooper) of
Causing His Name to Live: Studies in Egyptian History and Epigraphy in Memory of William J. Murnane
(Leiden: E. J. Brill, 2009).

MORE INFORMATION

Go to http://home.comcast.net/~hebsed/lectures.htm or send email to Chapter President Al Berens at
***@comcast.net.

-----

Glenn Meyer
Publicity Director
Northern California ARCE
Glenn Meyer
2015-12-30 07:13:47 UTC
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Resending to correct chapter website. Apologies.

Glenn
Post by Glenn Meyer
PLEASE NOTE THE CHANGE IN LOCATION, FOR THIS LECTURE ONLY!!
The Northern California Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt; the Department of Near
Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley; and the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley, are
Using 3D Modeling and Digital Imaging to Record Ancient Inscriptions
In the Great Hypostyle Hall of Karnak Temple
By Dr. Peter Brand, Dunavant Professor of Ancient History
Department of History, University of Memphis
WHEN: 2:30 p.m. Sunday, January 10, 2016
WHERE: Drawing Room, Berkeley City Club, 2315 Durant Ave., Berkeley, CA
There is no admission, but donations are welcomed.
ABOUT THE LECTURE
The 134 giant sandstone columns of the Great Hypostyle Hall are a virtual petrified forest, each
of them blanketed with thousands of hieroglyphic texts and hundreds of elaborately carved scenes
representing kings and gods. This dazzling array of ancient information technology has long
daunted visitors and even scholars attempting to decode this complex three-dimensional matrix of
pharaonic history and culture. A fourth dimension is the passage of 33 centuries since the
pharaohs Seti I and Ramesses II constructed the Great Hypostyle Hall around 1300 BCE. Since then,
several pharaohs, High Priests, Medieval squatters and visitors from the Greco-Roman period down
to today have literally left their marks with new inscriptions, graffiti and even iconoclastic
vandalism of human and animal forms in the scenes and hieroglyphs. Using 3D modeling, digital
photography and other high tech methods, the Hypostyle Hall Project is now recording and decoding
this titanic ancient "puzzle box," revealing new insights into how the Egyptians created such
artistic marvels and the subtle coded language of the hieroglyphic "software" that served as a
magical operating system for this vast pharaonic machine.
ABOUT THE LECTURER
Peter Brand is a Canadian Egyptologist from Toronto, Ontario, and a naturalized American citizen.
He is the Dunavant Professor of Ancient History at the Department of History, University of
Memphis and also the Director of the Karnak Great Hypostyle Hall Project of the University of
Memphis, which aims to record and publish all the monumental inscriptions and reliefs from this
huge building.
Brand studied at the University of Texas at Arlington and the University of Memphis and completed
his PhD in Ancient Egyptian Language and Literature University of Toronto in 1998. His
dissertation The Monuments of Seti I: Epigraphic, Historical and Art Historical Analysis, which
was published by Brill in 2000 is considered to be one of the most comprehensive studies on the
reign of Seti I who is often eclipsed in history by the glorious 66-year reign of his son,
Ramesses II. The book contains a catalogue of most of Seti I's monuments and an important
discussion of the historical significance and reigns of Ramesses I and Seti I. He is also and
co-editor (with Louise Cooper) of Causing His Name to Live: Studies in Egyptian History and
Epigraphy in Memory of William J. Murnane (Leiden: E. J. Brill, 2009).
MORE INFORMATION
Go to http://arce-nc.org/lectures.htm or send email to Chapter President Al Berens at
-----
Glenn Meyer
Publicity Director
Northern California ARCE
Glenn Meyer
2016-01-15 04:52:38 UTC
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Department of Near Eastern Studies
254 Barrows Hall

Monday, January 25, 2016, 4-6 PM

Franziska Naether
University of Leipzig
Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, NYU)

Casino Royale in ancient skyscrapers?
On recent finds from Roman tower houses in Tuna el-Gebel

In recent campaigns in Tuna el-Gebel (Ashmunein/Hermoupolis Magna), several
six-sided dice have been unearthed. These have been found in settlements of
tower houses close to the temple, and the archaeological evidence suggests
that these houses must have been priestly properties. The dice are small and
of simple material, and may have been manipulated. In my talk, I wish to
compare them with other dice found in Egypt and elsewhere in the Roman Empire,
link them with Greek and Egyptian documents of cult practices and discuss the
options for their possible utilization: were they intended for games,
gambling, or religious practice?

Sponsored by the Center for the Tebtunis Papyri and the Department of Near
Eastern Studies

Contact: ***@berkeley.edu
Glenn Meyer
2016-01-27 06:22:44 UTC
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Film Classic Loves of Pharaoh To Screen at Historic Niles Theater

Feb. 21 showing of restored silent costume epic to benefit Egyptology outreach

Fremont, Calif. — Film history meets ancient history Sunday, Feb. 21 as the American Research Center
in Egypt’s Northern California chapter hosts a rare screening of director Ernst Lubitsch’s silent
film classic, The Loves of Pharaoh (1922), at the Niles Essanay Silent Film Museum in Fremont.

Lubitsch, a German émigré, left Berlin soon after making Loves of Pharaoh to become one of
Hollywood’s great comedic directors. The film was believed lost until a few years ago. Restoration
was completed in 2011 by German film expert Thomas Bakels from footage salvaged in several countries
and funding from several European entities. The film is rare: Only a handful of copies exist in U.S.
libraries.Gartenberg Media Enterprises, the exclusive U.S. distributor, is providing Loves of
Pharaoh, a vintage cinematic tribute to ancient Egypt, to benefit ARCE-NorCal’s work in promoting
Egyptological research today. The event location, the Niles Essanay Silent Film Museum, is itself
important in film history as the site of a theater and movie studio where Charlie Chaplin and other
silent stars worked in the 1910s. The projection booth remains much as it was in 1913, and is open
for free public tours.

Screening to fund free talks by world’s top Egyptologists

Proceeds from the Feb. 21 matinee will fund ARCE Northern California’s free speaker series at UC
Berkeley. Speakers in 2015 included Dr. Nicholas Reeves, who made world headlines last year by
asserting the presence of concealed chambers in King Tut’s tomb. Also funded will be ARCE-NorCal’s
free talks by Egyptologists in Bay Area elementary school classrooms.

Viewing a bygone Egypt to help further cutting-edge research

“Audiences are in for a treat,” said theater historian Gary Lee Parks, a longtime ARCE-NorCal member
and co-organizer of the Feb. 21 event. The restored Loves of Pharaoh includes the original
background tints – because colors were often added to silent epics to help set the mood – English
subtitles and a new recording of the original 1922 score. Lubitsch worked with his own day’s great
Egyptologists to ensure accuracy – with varying results – and Paramount Pictures funding. The film
boasts vast sets and crowd scenes, beautiful replicas, and gorgeous lighting that advanced the art
of cinematography, all enabled by a strong U.S. dollar in the tumultuous years after World War I.

“We’ll see Egypt as people saw it in 1922, and in so doing we’ll help promote the latest
understanding of ancient Egypt today,” Parks said.

Tickets are $22 advance/$25 at the door and are fully tax deductible. Advance tickets are available
at ARCE-NorCal’s PayPal link at http://www.arce-nc.org/Fundraiser.htm

Founded in 1948, the American Research Center in Egypt (ARCE) is a private, nonprofit organization
of educational and cultural institutions, professional scholars, and individuals. ARCE’s mission is
to support research on all aspects of Egyptian history and culture, foster a broader knowledge of
Egypt among the general public, and strengthen U.S.-Egyptian cultural ties.

Loves of Pharaoh

Sunday, February 21, 2016 1:30 pm

Niles Essanay Silent Film Museum
37417 Niles Boulevard, Fremont, CA 94536

$22 donation per person

###

For more information:

Barbara Wilcox, ARCE Northern California
510-372-7755
***@yahoo.com

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