Discussion:
Tablet of Abydos? British Museum or Temple of Seti I
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paris2venice
2012-02-12 04:58:17 UTC
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If I may ask, please don't try to answer this if you are just
speculating. I really want an authoritative answer.

In 2008, I went to the British Museum in London and saw the Tablet of
Abydos. I snapped photos of it. It is just down the hall from the
Rosetta Stone on the lefthand side. It wasn't perfectly preserved but
the cartouches of the pharaohs are there.

Last month, I went to the Temple of Seti I in Abydos itself and saw
the kinglist on an inner wall as well. Again, I have photos of it.
It was almost perfectly preserved and the cartouche of Narmer, among
others, is easily recognizable.

Do I understand correctly that the kinglist in the British Museum is
that taken from the nearby Temple of Ramesses II in Abydos? And that
is why there are two?

Unrelated, may I ask one other question of those who have been to
Abydos? Our 16-night vacation in Egypt last month was almost entirely
on our own meaning we weren't ever with a group except for our 3-night
Nile Cruise. Our side trip to Abydos was unplanned until I reserved a
room at the Mara House in Luxor which offered the side trip as part of
a package. Thus, when driving to Abydos, the guide informed me, much
to my disappointment when I asked about it, that Umm al-Qa'ab and
Shunet ez Zebib were not accessible to tourists. Because we were held
up for two hours by a protest on the border of the govern ate, we
probably would not have been able to see either of them anyway as we
barely had enough time to see the Temple of Seti I, the Osireion and
the Temple of Hathor in Dendera. Anyway, is it really true that Umm
al-Qa'ab and Shunet ez Zebib cannot be visited by tourists? If the
guide is indeed wrong, do you have any suggestions for me (for seeing
both of these) when I again go to Abydos? Thanks a bunch.
paris2venice
2012-02-17 04:21:58 UTC
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Post by paris2venice
If I may ask, please don't try to answer this if you are just
speculating.  I really want an authoritative answer.
In 2008, I went to the British Museum in London and saw the Tablet of
Abydos.  I snapped photos of it.  It is just down the hall from the
Rosetta Stone on the lefthand side.  It wasn't perfectly preserved but
the cartouches of the pharaohs are there.
Last month, I went to the Temple of Seti I in Abydos itself and saw
the kinglist on an inner wall as well.  Again, I have photos of it.
It was almost perfectly preserved and the cartouche of Narmer, among
others, is easily recognizable.
Do I understand correctly that the kinglist in the British Museum is
that taken from the nearby Temple of Ramesses II in Abydos?  And that
is why there are two?
Unrelated, may I ask one other question of those who have been to
Abydos?  Our 16-night vacation in Egypt last month was almost entirely
on our own meaning we weren't ever with a group except for our 3-night
Nile Cruise.  Our side trip to Abydos was unplanned until I reserved a
room at the Mara House in Luxor which offered the side trip as part of
a package.  Thus, when driving to Abydos, the guide informed me, much
to my disappointment when I asked about it, that Umm al-Qa'ab and
Shunet ez Zebib were not accessible to tourists.  Because we were held
up for two hours by a protest on the border of the govern ate, we
probably would not have been able to see either of them anyway as we
barely had enough time to see the Temple of Seti I, the Osireion and
the Temple of Hathor in Dendera.  Anyway, is it really true that Umm
al-Qa'ab and Shunet ez Zebib cannot be visited by tourists?  If the
guide is indeed wrong, do you have any suggestions for me (for seeing
both of these) when I again go to Abydos?  Thanks a bunch.
Okay, I've determined that I was correct about the Tablet of Abydos
from the British Museum. It was taken from the Temple of Ramses II in
Abydos as I suspected.

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